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गणपति’s form महागणपति carries pomegranate in his hand. This is the season of worshiping him.

This is also season when many suffer from food infection and poisoning.

This is also season dental issues like gingivitis and pyorrhea.

Worshiping Ganesha during this month (भाद्रपद) and eating pomegranate after meals will save you from any type of bacterial infection and food poisoning. It will maintain optimum GUT microbes.

Season driven worship
Season driven worship

It also helps against aging related memory loss.

Pomegranate’s Neuroprotective Effects against Alzheimer’s Disease Src: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acschemneuro.5b00260
Pomegranate’s Neuroprotective Effects against Alzheimer’s Disease
Src: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acschemneuro.5b00260

What modern medicine shares are physical benefits of pomegranate. In my understanding, they are not complete unless we start worshiping Ganesha who represents Muladhara!


Reference for pomegranate


The antiplaque efficacy of pomegranate mouthrinse.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21206931

“these results indicate that the pomegranate mouthrinse has an antiplaque effect. Pomegranate extract is efficacious against A.a., P.g., and P.i. strains in vitro. Pomegranate mouthrinse should be explored as a long-term antiplaque rinse with prophylactic benefits.”

 

Pomegranate extract mouth rinsing effects on saliva measures relevant to gingivitis risk.

“Four weeks of mouth rinsing, thrice daily, with the pomegranate extract dissolved in water, altered salivary measures pertinent to oral health, including gingivitis. The changes were: Decreased total protein (which can correlate with plaque forming bacteria readings), diminished activities of aspartate aminotransferase (a marker of cell injury), attenuated alpha-glucosidase activity (a sucrose degrading enzyme), enhanced activities of the antioxidant enzyme ceruloplasmin (affording superior protection against oral oxidant stress), and augmented radical scavenging capacity (however non-significant). Hence, the use of pomegranate extracts in oral health products such as toothpastes and mouthwashes could be a viable option.”

Punica granatum (pomegranate) extract is active against dental plaque.

In the present work, we studied the effect of the hydroalcoholic extract (HAE) from Punica granatum (pomegranate) fruits on dental plaque microorganisms. The study was conducted on 60 healthy patients (33 females and 27 males, with age ranging from 9 to 25 years) using fixed orthodontic appliances, and randomly distributed into 3 groups of 20 patients each. The first group (control) used distilled water, while the second and third groups used chlorhexidine (standard) and HAE as mouth-rinses, respectively. The dental plaque material was collected from each patient, before and after a 1-min mouth-rinse with 15 ml of either distilled water, chlorhexidine or HAE. In both dental plaque collections, the material was removed from patients without oral hygiene, for 24 h (no tooth brushing). Dental plaque samples were diluted in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) plated on Mueller-Hinton agar, and incubated for 48 h, at 37 degrees C. Results, expressed as the number of colony forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL), show that the HAE was very effective against dental plaque microorganisms, decreasing the CFU/ml by 84% (CFU x 10(5)), before mouth-rinse: 154.0 +/- 41.18; after mouthrinse: 25.4 +/- 7.76). While similar values were observed with chlorhexidine, used as standard and positive control (79% inhibition), only an 11% inhibition of CFU/ml was demonstrated in the distilled water group, negative control (CFU x 10(5)), before mouth-rinse: chlorhexidine, 208.7 +/- 58.81 and distilled water, 81.1 +/- 10.12; after mouth-rinse: chlorhexidine, 44.0 +/- 15.85 and distilled water, 71.9 +/- 8.68). The HAE presented also an antibacterial activity against selected microorganisms, and may be a possible alternative for the treatment of dental plaque bacteria.

Gut bacteria make pomegranate metabolites that may protect against Alzheimer’s disease

Pomegranate’s Neuroprotective Effects against Alzheimer’s Disease Are Mediated by Urolithins, Its Ellagitannin-Gut Microbial Derived Metabolites

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acschemneuro.5b00260

Pomegranate shows neuroprotective effects against Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in several reported animal studies. However, whether its constituent ellagitannins and/or their physiologically relevant gut microbiota-derived metabolites, namely, urolithins (6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-one derivatives), are the responsible bioactive constituents is unknown. Therefore, from a pomegranate extract (PE), previously reported by our group to have anti-AD effects in vivo, 21 constituents, which were primarily ellagitannins, were isolated and identified (by HPLC, NMR, and HRESIMS). In silico computational studies, used to predict blood-brain barrier permeability, revealed that none of the PE constituents, but the urolithins, fulfilled criteria required for penetration. Urolithins prevented β-amyloid fibrillation in vitro and methyl-urolithin B (3-methoxy-6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-one), but not PE or its predominant ellagitannins, had a protective effect in Caenorhabditis elegans post induction of amyloid β1–42 induced neurotoxicity and paralysis. Therefore, urolithins are the possible brain absorbable compounds which contribute to pomegranate’s anti-AD effects warranting further in vivo studies on these compounds.

Pomegranate finally reveals its powerful anti-aging secret

Intestinal bacteria transform a molecule contained in the fruit with spectacular results

Urolithin A induces mitophagy and prolongs lifespan in C. elegans and increases muscle function in rodents

http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/v22/n8/full/nm.4132.html

Are pomegranates really the superfood we’ve been led to believe will counteract the aging process? Up to now, scientific proof has been fairly weak. And some controversial marketing tactics have led to skepticism as well. A team of scientists from EPFL and the company Amazentis wanted to explore the issue by taking a closer look at the secrets of this plump pink fruit. They discovered that a molecule in pomegranates, transformed by microbes in the gut, enables muscle cells to protect themselves against one of the major causes of aging. In nematodes and rodents, the effect is nothing short of amazing. Human clinical trials are currently underway, but these initial findings have already been published in the journal Nature Medicine.

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