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Nehru govt was the most retarded govt in our history who introduced artificial fertilizer units across country and destroyed fertility of the land.

All because of fanatic obsession with western masters life.

One more aspect that green revolution apologists must read. This ostrich vision is right now guiding prime minister of India so we must act, educate farmers and raise their voice.

No agriculture university in India is doing such independent researchers. Forget about them educating farmers.

Prime Minister, in his recent speech did mention over-use of NPK formula but on the other hand he also promoted Genetically modified bananas! So I consider his stand deceptive as far as agriculture matters.

As per this research, when exposed to nitrogen fertilizer over a period of years, nitrogen-fixing bacteria called rhizobia evolve to become less beneficial to legumes — the plants they normally serve, researchers report in a new study.

Researchers call it -> “far-reaching ecological and environmental consequences,”

Havoc is already been implemented on India soil

Not that long ago, before the advent of industrial fertilizers and the widespread use of fossil fuels, soil nitrogen was a scarce commodity. Some plants, the legumes, found a way to procure the precious nitrogen they needed — from rhizobia.

“The rhizobia fix nitrogen — from atmospheric nitrogen that we’re breathing in and out all the time — to plant-available forms,” Heath said. “Plants can’t just take it up from the atmosphere; they have to get it in the form of nitrate or ammonium.”

Nitrogen

In return, legumes shelter the rhizobia in their roots and supply them with carbon. This partnership benefits the bacteria and gives legumes an advantage in nitrogen-poor soils. Previous studies have shown that nitrogen fertilizers can affect the diversity of species that grow in natural areas, Heath said. In areas polluted with fertilizer runoff, for example, legumes decline while other plants become more common.

What exactly is happening?
We are changing the प्राणिक footprints of the local environment. And this is no way helping crops. We are killing natural mutualisms. This is not science but moronic pseudo-science.


Research


Long-term nitrogen fertilizer use disrupts plant-microbe mutualisms

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN

When exposed to nitrogen fertilizer over a period of years, nitrogen-fixing bacteria called rhizobia evolve to become less beneficial to legumes – the plants they normally serve, researchers report in a new study.

These findings, reported in the journal Evolution, may be of little interest to farmers, who generally grow only one type of plant and can always add more fertilizer to boost plant growth. But in natural areas adjacent to farmland, where fertilizer runoff occurs, or in areas where nitrogen oxides from the burning of fossil fuels settle, a change in the quality of soil rhizobia could have “far-reaching ecological and environmental consequences,” the researchers wrote.

“The nitrogen that we apply to agricultural fields doesn’t stay on those fields, and atmospheric nitrogen deposition doesn’t stay by the power plant that generates it,” said University of Illinois plant biology professor Katy Heath , who led the study with Jennifer Lau , of Michigan State University. “So this work is not just about a fertilized soybean field. Worldwide, the nitrogen cycle is off. We’ve changed it fundamentally.”

Not that long ago, before the advent of industrial fertilizers and the widespread use of fossil fuels, soil nitrogen was a scarce commodity. Some plants, the legumes, found a way to procure the precious nitrogen they needed – from rhizobia.

“The rhizobia fix nitrogen – from atmospheric nitrogen that we’re breathing in and out all the time – to plant-available forms,” Heath said. “Plants can’t just take it up from the atmosphere; they have to get it in the form of nitrate or ammonium.”

In return, legumes shelter the rhizobia in their roots and supply them with carbon. This partnership benefits the bacteria and gives legumes an advantage in nitrogen-poor soils. Previous studies have shown that nitrogen fertilizers can affect the diversity of species that grow in natural areas, Heath said. In areas polluted with fertilizer runoff, for example, legumes decline while other plants become more common.

In the new analysis, Heath and her colleagues looked at six long-term ecological research fields at Michigan State University’s Kellogg Biological Station. Two experimental plots were located in each of six different fields. One plot in each field had been fertilized with nitrogen for more than two decades; the other, a control plot, had never been fertilized.

The researchers isolated rhizobia from the nodules of legumes in fertilized and unfertilized plots. In a greenhouse experiment, they tested how these bacteria influenced legume growth and health. The researchers found that the plants grown with the nitrogen-exposed rhizobia produced 17 to 30 percent less biomass and significantly less chlorophyll than plants grown with rhizobia from the unfertilized plots.

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-02/uoia-lnf022315.php

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