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Drinking Water and Role of Saliva
Drinking Water and Role of Saliva

Since Reverse Osmosis (RO) water is debunked by many, including doctors for their inability to provide correct composition of water, there is new trend emerging. By hook or crook, we must sell water solutions! 😀

Ionized water. Yes! Magic machine that can ionize your water! 🙂 So when you drink such water with alkaline composition, you can slowdown aging and all.

This is the problem of human mimicry of mother nature. Once we learn the benefit of certain phenomenon, we try to build solution with larger than life model. We actually fool ourselves by claiming perfect mimic of the mother nature. Such alkaline water may be good for some for some days but not always because same PH cannot work for all family members! 😀

Instead of spending Rs 15000+ in buying this magic machine, here is the free of cost solution to make your food alkaline and control stomach acidity and by the save self from all unforeseen issues like ulcer and cancer.

1) Drink water sip by sip. Slowly. Very slow. As if you are chewing water.
2) Chew food as much as possible. As many times as teeth you have. If you have 28, 28 times. 32 => 32 times.

Try it for 90 days and give me feedback. 🙂

Our saliva is ninety-nine per cent water. The remaining one per cent, however, contains numerous substances important for digestion, dental health and control of microbial growth in the mouth.

This 1% of Saliva knows very well how to make your food or water alkaline. The salivary glands in our mouth produce about 1-2 litres of saliva daily. Blood plasma is used as the basis, from which the salivary glands extract some substances and add various others. The list of ingredients found so far in saliva is long, and growing. Just as varied are the many functions, of which only a few major ones will be outlined below.

There are many benefits but let us focus on Ionization of water and food. As you start helping your food and water to stay longer in the mouth, you sprinkle them with nectar called ‘Saliva’.

Saliva is full of Ions. It is ion reservoir. More time food and water spend in mouth, better amalgamation of ions with it. Making it more alkaline.

Hydroxyapatite only forms when enough hydroxyl (OH-) and phosphate (PO43-) ions are present. Such conditions prevail at alkaline pH (pH>7). Under acidic conditions the OH- ions turn to water and the phosphate ions to mono-, di-, and trihydrogen phosphates. These do not fit into the crystal lattice and are washed away.7 Our saliva prevents this through buffering substances that keep the pH near neutral, i.e. around 7. If the pH is too alkaline over a prolonged period, the hydroxyapatite grows too quickly, leading to scale (dental calculus). In contrast, continued exposure to acidic fluids (pH<7), e.g. when sucking juice from a baby bottle, leads to porous, thin enamel.

For Mother’s gift (our body), there is always motherly solution. 🙂 And mother never charge. She only expects dharma from us. 🙂


Research


Saliva – more than just water in your mouth

http://www.eufic.org/article/en/artid/Saliva-more-than-just-water-in-your-mouth/

Saliva as a builder

The hard matter of our teeth – enamel and dentine – consists of a very hard crystal called hydroxyapatite. Hydroxyapatite is made from calcium, phosphate and hydroxyl ions. Additionally, it contains organic molecules, mainly collagen, and in the case of dentine also cellular projections from odontoblasts (cells that produce dentine).

Source of building blocks

Because of its specific properties water can dissolve out ions from salt crystals. Table salt for example quickly disintegrates in water into its constituent sodium and chloride ions. Although in hydroxyapatite the ions are bound very tightly, in water the crystal would steadily lose ions from the surface and shrink. To reverse this process, our saliva is saturated with calcium and phosphate ions. These occupy the spaces freed up in the crystal lattice and thus prevent continuous corrosion of the enamel surface. If our saliva was constantly diluted with water, the concentration of calcium phosphate would be insufficient and the tooth enamel would start to erode. This happens for example in the so-called nursing bottle syndrome seen in infants. Due to prolonged sucking on the baby bottle, even if only filled with water, the teeth become porous and typical caries on the upper front teeth develops.5 Good oral hygiene including twice daily brushing of teeth with fluoride-containing toothpaste, and minimising prolonged exposure of teeth to drinks with fermentable carbohydrates (e.g. juice, milk, formula) are some of the strategies that may help reduce the risk.6

Neutralisation of acids

Hydroxyapatite only forms when enough hydroxyl (OH) and phosphate (PO43-) ions are present. Such conditions prevail at alkaline pH (pH>7). Under acidic conditions the OH ions turn to water and the phosphate ions to mono-, di-, and trihydrogen phosphates. These do not fit into the crystal lattice and are washed away.7 Our saliva prevents this through buffering substances that keep the pH near neutral, i.e. around 7. If the pH is too alkaline over a prolonged period, the hydroxyapatite grows too quickly, leading to scale (dental calculus). In contrast, continued exposure to acidic fluids (pH<7), e.g. when sucking juice from a baby bottle, leads to porous, thin enamel.5

 

 

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