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Iodine

Tata,Reliance and every other Salt Giant in India talks of Iodine in the salts they make. From Doctors, dietitians to Govt of India, everyone go gaga over Iodine salt.

How healthy it is?

As per this report, cooking with Iodine salt and chlorinated tap water creates toxins!

It is always good to use Sendha Namak/Rock Salt for daily salt requirement in cooking.

The Salt Game : Iodine salt with chlorinated tap water creates Toxins

So what if not salt? How do we get Iodine intake?

Well, I was taught by my grand-parents that गौ-दुग्ध is सम्पूर्ण आहार. So I take help of गौ माता.

I am not talking about pasteurized dairy milk but raw milk from desi bos indicus cows giving A2 milk as prasad.

Here is the interesting study showing link between Iodine and Cow milk.

Consumers of milk-alternative drinks may be at of risk iodine deficiency, according to the findings of a new study.

This study might be talking about Iodine but it is not just about it! As i said,  गौ-दुग्ध is सम्पूर्ण आहार. Cow milk is the complete diet.

This will help you to understand:

  1. Why raw cow milk is must during pregnancy?
  2. Why raw cow milk is must for kids in growth phase (up to age 12)
  3. How cow milk can play role in chronic hormonal imbalance symptoms

Research


Milk-alternative drinks do not replace the iodine in cows’ milk

Consumers of milk-alternative drinks may be at of risk iodine deficiency, according to the findings of a new study in the British Journal of Nutrition.

https://www.surrey.ac.uk/mediacentre/press/2017/milk-alternative-drinks-do-not-replace-iodine-cows%E2%80%99-milk

Consumers of milk-alternative drinks may be at of risk iodine deficiency, according to the findings of a new study in the British Journal of Nutrition.

In the first study of its kind in the United Kingdom, researchers from the University of Surrey examined the iodine content of 47 milk-alternative drinks (including soya, almond, coconut, oat, rice, hazelnut and hemp, but excluding those marketed specifically at infants and children) and compared it with that of cows’ milk.

Researchers discovered that the majority of milk-alternative drinks did not have adequate levels of iodine, with concentration levels found to be around 2% of that found in cows’ milk. Cows’ milk and dairy products are the main source of iodine in the UK diet however findings from the study show that most milk-alternative drinks are not an adequate substitute.

Iodine is required to make thyroid hormones, and is particularly important during pregnancy as it is essential for normal foetal brain development. Previous research in this area by the University of Surrey has shown that low iodine status in pregnant mothers is linked to lower IQ and reading scores in their children (up to 9 years of age).

Iodine concentration of milk-alternative drinks available in the UK in comparison with cows’ milk

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition/article/iodine-concentration-of-milkalternative-drinks-available-in-the-uk-in-comparison-with-cows-milk/C0EB7183E42B81548331405F83332258

Iodine deficiency is present in certain groups of the UK population, notably in pregnant women; this is of concern as iodine is required for fetal brain development. UK milk is rich in iodine and is the principal dietary iodine source. UK sales of milk-alternative drinks are increasing but data are lacking on their iodine content. As consumers may replace iodine-rich milk with milk-alternative drinks, we aimed to measure the iodine concentration of those available in the UK. Using inductively coupled plasma-MS, we determined the iodine concentration of seven types of milk-alternative drink (soya, almond, coconut, oat, rice, hazelnut and hemp) by analysing forty-seven products purchased in November/December 2015. For comparison, winter samples of conventional (n 5) and organic (n 5) cows’ milk were included. The median iodine concentration of all of the unfortified milk-alternative drinks (n 44) was low, at 7·3 μg/kg, just 1·7 % of our value for winter conventional cows’ milk (median 438 μg/kg). One brand (not the market leader), fortified its soya, oat and rice drinks with iodine and those drinks had a higher iodine concentration than unfortified drinks, at 280, 287 and 266 μg/kg, respectively. The iodine concentration of organic milk (median 324 μg/kg) was lower than that of conventional milk. Although many milk-alternative drinks are fortified with Ca, at the time of this study, just three of forty-seven drinks were fortified with iodine. Individuals who consume milk-alternative drinks that are not fortified with iodine in place of cows’ milk may be at risk of iodine deficiency unless they consume alternative dietary iodine sources.

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