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Few days back, I shared that I had a deep cut on hand and I applied Gau mutra on it. I followed it for a week. Along with Gau mutra, I also used to massage the wound with my early morning saliva. Wound is not only healed, skin color is also emerged back to normal color.

Who helped me?

Short answer: Skin microbes.

Long understanding: Gau mutra and Saliva controlled my skin friend microbes i.e. my प्राणमय कोष so that विकृत प्राण or प्राण against my prakruti does not assimilate at wound location.

Here is the paper supporting this theory:

Chronic wounds—cuts or lesions that just never seem to heal—are a significant health problem, particularly among elderly people. An estimated 1 in 20 elderly people live with a chronic wound, which often results from diabetes, poor blood circulation or being confined to bed or a wheelchair.
“These wounds can literally persist for years, and we simply have no good treatments to help a chronic wound heal,”

The trillions of bacteria that live on and in our bodies have attracted a great deal of scientific interest in recent years. Findings from studies of microbes in the gut have made it clear that although some bacteria cause disease, many other bacteria are highly beneficial for our health.

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Gobar, mutra, saliva (GMS) are natural bio-healers. While modern medicine has no solution for chronic wounds in elder people with already depleted प्राणमय कोष, GMS can help greatly.


Research


Bacteria on the Skin: New Insights on Our Invisible Companions

Study examines how skin-dwelling bacteria influence wound healing; findings could help address chronic wounds, a common ailment in the elderly

http://www.newswise.com/articles/bacteria-on-the-skin-new-insights-on-our-invisible-companions

Chronic wounds—cuts or lesions that just never seem to heal—are a significant health problem, particularly among elderly people. An estimated 1 in 20 elderly people live with a chronic wound, which often results from diabetes, poor blood circulation or being confined to bed or a wheelchair.

“These wounds can literally persist for years, and we simply have no good treatments to help a chronic wound heal,” said Hardman, who added that doctors currently have no reliable way to tell whether a wound will heal or persist. “There’s a definite need for better ways to both predict how a wound is going to heal and develop new treatments to promote healing.”

In their recent study, Hardman and his colleagues compared the skin bacteria from people with chronic wounds that did or did not heal. The results showed markedly different bacterial communities, suggesting there may be a bacterial “signature” of a wound that refuses to heal.

“Our data clearly support the idea that one could swab a wound, profile the bacteria that are there and then be able to tell whether the wound is likely to heal quickly or persist, which could impact treatment decisions,” said Hardman.

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