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aaron-burden-152622Groves are प्राणवर्धक. Growing food without groves? It is nothing but highly unscientific way of greed-based industry. It cannot be called Agriculture (कृषि). Soil cannot grow प्राणवर्धक food without groves, without biodiversity. Without biodiversity, food lacks प्राण. Without प्राण, who can survive? Of course, we can survive. But like a dead body with little प्राण and anything worth to contribute in universal यज्ञ.

We discussed about it at length here :

Sacred Grove : Lost tradition, lost microbial diversity, lost Prana

Unfortunately, present citizens and city counselors are living in suicide mode. Cutting trees everywhere. Cementing open space. Wall to wall rode carpeting. Using Green plots for other purposes. And on Sunday, all malls are full! 😀 😀 Poor guys.
 
And on the other hand, open more and more 5 Star hospitals 😀 😀 😀
 
Take radical steps. Demolish cemented roads. Grow new trees now. Or else, feel free to pay hefty hospital bills/ 😉 (y)
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Research
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Scientists have discovered that living near trees is good for your health

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2015/07/09/scientists-have-discovered-that-living-near-trees-is-good-for-your-health/?utm_term=.61d35f903bf2

The large study builds on a body of prior research showing the cognitive and psychological benefits of nature scenery — but also goes farther in actually beginning to quantify just how much an addition of trees in a neighborhood enhances health outcomes. The researchers, led by psychologist Omid Kardan of the University of Chicago, were able to do so because they were working with a vast dataset of public, urban trees kept by the city of Toronto — some 530,000 of them, categorized by species, location, and tree diameter — supplemented by satellite measurements of non-public green space (for instance, trees in a person’s back yard).

They also had the health records for over 30,000 Toronto residents, reporting not only individual self-perceptions of health but also heart conditions, prevalence of cancer, diabetes, mental health problems and much more.

https://www.nature.com/articles/srep11610

Neighborhood greenspace and health in a large urban center

Studies have shown that natural environments can enhance health and here we build upon that work by examining the associations between comprehensive greenspace metrics and health. We focused on a large urban population center (Toronto, Canada) and related the two domains by combining high-resolution satellite imagery and individual tree data from Toronto with questionnaire-based self-reports of general health perception, cardio-metabolic conditions and mental illnesses from the Ontario Health Study. Results from multiple regressions and multivariate canonical correlation analyses suggest that people who live in neighborhoods with a higher density of trees on their streets report significantly higher health perception and significantly less cardio-metabolic conditions (controlling for socio-economic and demographic factors). We find that having 10 more trees in a city block, on average, improves health perception in ways comparable to an increase in annual personal income of $10,000 and moving to a neighborhood with $10,000 higher median income or being 7 years younger. We also find that having 11 more trees in a city block, on average, decreases cardio-metabolic conditions in ways comparable to an increase in annual personal income of $20,000 and moving to a neighborhood with $20,000 higher median income or being 1.4 years younger.

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