SHARE

Our Brave forefathers in Naval Services, inspired by Subhash Chandra Bose INA’s heroic tryst with destiny, wrote with their blood a new chapter in the history of our freedom struggle. NO THING CAN WIPE OUT THE MEMORY OF those five historic days which shook the very foundations of imperial rule in India.

And you were taught that Mr. Gandhi & his team gave you freedom! Re-read real history and know your real HEROES!

RIN mutiny
RIN mutiny

If you want to know, who really gave you freedom, dedicate your Today for reading this.

1) RIN 1946 – Book by victimized RIN Ratings, Oct 1954 (Part)
https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B7R8KcZtJUs3TlVTTlhfeVliWjA

2) THE RIN strike by a group of victimized R.I.N. Ratings (1954) (Full)
https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B7R8KcZtJUs3LUxiRVdnczJza1E/edit?pli=1 (Google Docs, 20 MB)

3) RIN : 1946 (References and guide for all) by Biswanath Bose
https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B7R8KcZtJUs3XzFkd0VTN1B5ODA/edit (Google docs, 48 MB)

4) INDIAN NAVY REVOLTED AGAINST BRITAIN IN 1946 AND FORCED IT TO GIVE FREEDOM TO INDIA IN 1947-

http://oldphotosbombay.blogspot.in/2008/07/indian-naval-mutiny-of-1946-against.html

Following India’s Independence in 1947, generations of Indians have been taught that the real heroes of the Freedom Movement were Mahatma Gandhi and Jawaharlal Nehru, with grudging respect paid to Sardar Patel. Subhas Bose is all but forgotten. Even worse, he is the victim of a propaganda campaign by the Nehru Government and its successors that runs along the following lines: (i) Subhas Bose was an ineffective dreamer who played an insignificant part in the Freedom Struggle; and (ii) anyone questioning the official ‘truth’, including the account of his death, is some kind of a crackpot. The following passage by Surjit Mansingh in the Historical Dictionary of India illustrates both:

“Many Indians, especially in Bengal and Maharashtra, refused to believe [in his death in an air crash]…, perhaps because of a deep seated need to believe in an immortal hero, a saintly warrior king, even a Kalki or a future incarnation of Vishnu who would return to the nation when needed.” And later, writing about Subhas Bose himself: “…the Bose cult has not died despite his lack of a broad political base or solid political achievement when alive.”

So, according to Mansingh, who incidentally is a JNU professor and a former fellow at the Nehru Museum and Library, Subhas Bose is nothing but a cult figure who did little when he was alive. While this happens to be the ‘official’ (read Congress-Communist) line, not many historians today are prepared to buy it. Probably the most distinguished historian to highlight Bose’s real contribution was the late R.C. Majumdar. In his monumental, three-volume History of the Freedom Movement in India (which the Congress-led by Maulana Azad tried to suppress), Majumdar provided the following extraordinary information:

“It seldom falls to the lot of a historian to have his views, differing radically from those generally accepted without demur, confirmed by such an unimpeachable authority. As far back as 1948 I wrote in an article that the contribution made by Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose towards the achievement of freedom in 1947 was no less, and perhaps, far more important than that of Mahatma Gandhi…” The ‘unimpeachable authority’ he cited happens to be Clement Attlee, the Prime Minister of Britain at the time of India’s Independence. As this is of fundamental importance, and Majumdar’s conclusion so greatly at variance with conventional history, it is worth placing it on record. (See Volume III, pp. 609-10). When B.P. Chakravarti was acting as Governor of West Bengal, Lord Attlee visited India and stayed as his guest for three days at the Raj Bhavan. Chakravarti asked Attlee about the real grounds for granting Independence to India. Specifically, his question was, when the Quit India movement lay in ruins years before 1947, what was the need for the British to leave in such a hurry. Attlee’s response is most illuminating and important for history. Here is the Governor’s account of what Attlee told him:

“In reply Attlee cited several reasons, the most important were the activities of Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose which weakened the very foundation of the attachment of the Indian land and naval forces to the British Government. Towards the end, I asked Lord Attlee about the extent to which the British decision to quit India was influenced by Gandhi’s activities. On hearing this question Attlee’s lips widened in a smile of disdain and he uttered, slowly, putting emphasis on each single letter-”mi-ni-mal”.”
“The Government of India had hoped, by prosecuting members of the INA, to reinforce the morale of the Indian army. It succeeded only in creating unease, in making the soldiers feel slightly ashamed that they themselves had supported the British. If Bose and his men had been on the right side-and all India now confirmed that they were-then Indians in the Indian army must have been on the wrong side. It slowly dawned upon the Government of India that the backbone of the British rule, the Indian army, might now no longer be trustworthy. The ghost of Subhas Bose, like Hamlet’s father, walked the battlements of the Red Fort (where the INA soldiers trial was going on), and his suddenly amplified figure overawed the conference that was to lead to independence.[1]”

[1] The Last Years of British India, Cleveland, World Pub. Co., 1964, by Edwardes, Michael p. 106

 

1 COMMENT

  1. History is tough, never impartial and always written by ruling elite group…

    if current view of history.. that Gandhi and Ny is nehru were mainly responsible for winning us independence is wrong… why is british and international media not highlighted it??

    yes there was good relationship between british rulers and Nehru, but why has other version not popular? if there is…then it would be our duty to spread that message and make larger mass aware about it

LEAVE A REPLY