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Radiation

Problem with cow promoters in India is that they don’t talk the language of mass. And sometimes, become object of mockery.

One such case was when it was proclaimed that cow dung can protect against the radiation.

Yes, it does. How? Most of the times, we don’t have citations to support it.

Here is one research to help connect the dots.

Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) increased the survival rate of irradiated animals, elevated peripheral white blood cell counts and improved gastrointestinal tract function and intestinal epithelial integrity in irradiated male and female mice.


Remember one thing : Microbes are manifestation of Prana. Like how your body cells are. Life is interplay of different forms of Prana. Microbes, no exception.

If the faecal transplant can help protecting against radiation-induced toxicity, panchgavya (product made up of 5 prasad, rich in the form of microbes) can do wonder.

Faecal of an individual is not perfect but cow dung and urine of desi cow is perfect when cow is taken care well. (Well-fed, stress-free, grazing)


Research


Faecal microbiota transplantation protects against radiation‐induced toxicity

Severe radiation exposure may cause acute radiation syndrome, a possibly fatal condition requiring effective therapy. Gut microbiota can be manipulated to fight against many diseases. We explored whether intestinal microbe transplantation could alleviate radiation‐induced toxicity. High‐throughput sequencing showed that gastrointestinal bacterial community composition differed between male and female mice and was associated with susceptibility to radiation toxicity. Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) increased the survival rate of irradiated animals, elevated peripheral white blood cell counts and improved gastrointestinal tract function and intestinal epithelial integrity in irradiated male and female mice. FMT preserved the intestinal bacterial composition and retained mRNA and long non‐coding RNA expression profiles of host small intestines in a sex‐specific fashion. Despite promoting angiogenesis, sex‐matched FMT did not accelerate the proliferation of cancer cells in vivo. FMT might serve as a therapeutic to mitigate radiation‐induced toxicity and improve the prognosis of tumour patients after radiotherapy.

Faecal microbiota transplantation ameliorates radiation‐induced toxicity in irradiated mice by improving gastrointestinal tract function and epithelial integrity, preserving gut bacterial composition and maintaining the small intestine transcriptome.

  • Gut microbiota determines the radiosensitivity of hosts.

  • Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) fights against radiation‐induced gastrointestinal toxicity.

  • FMT preserves enteric bacterial composition and retains the RNA expression profile of irradiated hosts.

  • FMT might emerge as a therapeutic schedule in tumour radiotherapy to improve prognosis.

Read more: http://embomolmed.embopress.org/content/early/2017/02/27/emmm.201606932

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