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Researchers at the University of Adelaide say addictive behaviour such as drug and alcohol abuse could be associated with poor development of the so-called “love hormone” system in our bodies during early childhood.[1]

Parenting

• Nuclear family structure,
• Frequently changing job locations and hence frequently changing neighborhoods,
• Lack of empathic teachers
• Lack of attachment with local culture, mother tongue
• Constant struggle between parents
• Parents – more attention for individual self-interest than child-interest or family-interest

All above contributes largely in lack of emotions and love relations for growing child

Result?

Addiction and abuse.
Solution?
Pause. Go back to your roots. Joint family. Stability over career growth. Time spent in searching quality food over time spent on entertainment.
Lot more to learn from your dead grandparents. Sooner, better.

Moment a thought process for child planning start to child’s upanayan samskar (age 6 to 12 – depending upon child’s capacity), all parents should aim for stability over personal achievements. At least, we can do this in our chaotic times


Research


 

[1]

Oxytocin in learning and addiction: From early discoveries to the present

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0091305713003183

Abstract

Oxytocin (OXT) has a plethora of effects on brain function. This review provides a historical overview of the development of research on OXT and drug addiction. By focusing on research that has emerged from our laboratories, we describe how early discoveries of the influence of OXT on learning and memory processes and the emerging conceptualization of addiction as ‘pathological learning’ have contributed to the demonstration that OXT effectively attenuates long-term neuroadaptation related to opiate and psychostimulant addiction. Through integrating earlier evidence with recent discoveries of the social/affiliative role of OXT, we propose that OXT may interfere with reward and addiction by influencing neurobiological processes involved in stress, learning and memory and social/affiliative behavior.

Can ‘love hormone’ protect against addiction?

http://www.adelaide.edu.au/news/news69442.html

Researchers at the University of Adelaide say addictive behaviour such as drug and alcohol abuse could be associated with poor development of the so-called “love hormone” system in our bodies during early childhood.

The groundbreaking idea has resulted from a review of worldwide research into oxytocin, known as the “love hormone” or “bonding drug” because of its important role in enhancing social interactions, maternal behaviour and partnership.

This month’s special edition of the international journal Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior deals with the current state of research linking oxytocin and addiction, and has been guest edited by Dr Femke Buisman-Pijlman from the University of Adelaide’s School of Medical Sciences.

Dr Buisman-Pijlman, who has a background in both addiction studies and family studies, says some people’s lack of resilience to addictive behaviours may be linked to poor development of their oxytocin systems.

“We know that newborn babies already have levels of oxytocin in their bodies, and this helps to create the all-important bond between a mother and her child. But our oxytocin systems aren’t fully developed when we’re born – they don’t finish developing until the age of three, which means our systems are potentially subject to a range of influences both external and internal,” Dr Buisman-Pijlman says.

She says the oxytocin system develops mainly based on experiences.

“The main factors that affect our oxytocin systems are genetics, gender and environment. You can’t change the genes you’re born with, but environmental factors play a substantial role in the development of the oxytocin system until our systems are fully developed,” Dr Buisman-Pijlman says.

“Previous research has shown that there is a high degree of variability in people’s oxytocin levels. We’re interested in how and why people have such differences in oxytocin, and what we can do about it to have a beneficial impact on people’s health and wellbeing,” she says.

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