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Conch-shell and microbes https://i.ytimg.com/vi/qgVhFBHSYRk/maxresdefault.jpg
Conch-shell and microbes
https://i.ytimg.com/vi/qgVhFBHSYRk/maxresdefault.jpg

Blowing conch-shell is a well-known ritual. If try to do research (Or rather Google search 🙂 ), you will find many spiritual answers.

For example:
” When the conch is blown with controlled breath, the primordial sound of “Om” emanates from it. This eternal sound is the origin of all Vedas. All knowledge enshrined in the Vedas is an elaboration of the omnipresent sublime sound of Om. It was this sound that was chanted by the Lord before manifesting the cosmos. It represents the creation and the Truth behind it.”
“It is believed the blowing shankha destroys enemies and also pleases goddess Lakshmi.”

For individuals blowing conch, following benefits are found

Not just for religion, blowing shankha has scientific and ayurvedic benefits also. As per them, blowing shankha during puja has benefits on our lungs. This is because for blowing a shankha pure air reaches the lungs and impure air comes out. This makes the lungs strong.Blowing shankha also cures diseases of intestines.

No ritual of Hinduism is for selfish motives. What about environmental impact that can help all in vicinity?

For optimum environmental help, responsibility of blowing conch-shell is given to only those who has full control over breathe. Not everyone can blow it. It is not about the intensity but about the right sound frequencies.

Why?

Microbes(=Maruts) can sense sonic vibrations[1]. Link between sonic vibrations of Conchshell blowing on auspicious days/begining of new task and behaviour of Maruts should be studied. Right sound, right microbes.

When microbial conversations get physical

It is widely accepted that microorganisms are social beings. Whereas communication via chemical signals (e.g. quorum sensing) has been the focus of most investigations, the use of physical signals for microbial cell-cell communication has received only limited attention. Here, I argue that physical modes of microbial communication could be widespread in nature. This is based on experimental evidence on the microbial emission and response to three physical signals: sound waves, electromagnetic radiation, and electric currents. These signals propagate rapidly and, even at very low intensities, they provide useful mechanisms when a rapid response is required. I also make some suggestions for promising future research avenues that could bring novel and unsuspected insights into the physical nature of microbial signaling networks.
The average spectrum had three broad frequency peaks that matched well with the B. carboniphilus growth-promoting frequencies. Thus, these early studies suggested that some microbial cells might be able to communicate using sounds.
Sound waves are generated when objects vibrate. Essential cellular processes, such as the activity of molecular motors and the cytoskeleton, enzymatic reactions, chromosome packaging and replication, transcription, and protein synthesis, folding or unfolding, generate forces that induce intracellular motions [10–19]. The polar oscillation of proteins during cell division [20] or cytoskeleton assembly [21] also contribute greatly to the dynamics of the cell interior and generate polarizing ionic currents inside the cell and charge-induced nanoscale motions. The global effect of intracellular motions is that cells and their components vibrate. Using the sensitivity of an atomic force microscope (AFM) to probe cellular nanomechanics in an acoustically insulated environment, Pelling et al. demonstrated that the cell wall of single, living cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibited local, periodic nanoscale motions of similar average amplitude (3.0 ± 0.5 nm), yet variable, temperature-dependent frequencies (0.9–1.6 kHz) [22]. These results not only demonstrated that intracellular motions were strong enough to propagate across the stiff yeast cell wall, they also showed they could generate reproducible acoustic signals. Furthermore, the motions disappeared after treatment with the metabolic inhibitor sodium azide, suggesting they had a metabolic origin. The oscillations of single cells had activation energies (58 kJ/mol) and velocities such as those reported for cytoskeleton motors. The magnitude of the forces (~10 nN) was such that it would have required the concerted action of several molecular motors, as expected of a dedicated system that transmitted the metabolic status of the cell as mechanical vibration and sound [22].
Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3057284/

Production of sound waves by bacterial cells and the response of bacterial cells to sound.

Bacterial cells enhance the proliferation of neighboring cells under stress conditions by emitting a physical signal. Continuous single sine sound waves produced by a speaker at frequencies of 6-10, 18-22, and 28-38 kHz promoted colony formation by Bacillus carboniphilus under non-permissive stress conditions of high KCl concentration and high temperature. Furthermore, sound waves emitted from cells of Bacillus subtilis at frequencies between 8 and 43 kHz with broad peaks at approximately 8.5, 19, 29, and 37 kHz were detected using a sensitive microphone system. The similarity between the frequency of the sound produced by B. subtilis and the frequencies that induced a response in B. carboniphilus and the previously observed growth-promoting effect of B. subtilis cells upon B. carboniphilus through iron barriers, suggest that the detected sound waves function as a growth-regulatory signal between cells.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12501293
Sound and Microbes http://link.springer.com/article/10.1134/S0026261715020125#/page-1
Sound and Microbes
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1134/S0026261715020125#/page-1

keep blowing Conchshell with full faith. I am sure, it is helping Marut(s) to develop positive environment for our success. 🙂

While we discussed sound waves and microbes, radio waves also create impact.

Exchange of information is critical for bacterial social behaviors. Bacterias aka Maruts never survive individually. They live in groups. Their existence critically depends upon their communication.

How do they communicate?

Chemically triggered messages that can easily couriered from one body to another.
Radio frequency waves. Yes the ones that we use in our communication

There is no doubt that our Wi-fried transmission of unlimited 2G,3G,4G is disturbing their communication channels. One communication lines are attacked, it is difficult for microbial communities to survive.

Result?

Something that modern medicine and technology has not yet linked (or do not want to link for vested interests). Our dieseases -> dying healthy bacteria -> damanged communication -> 2G,3G,4G nuke bombs.

Theoretical physicists offer explanation of how bacteria might generate radio waves

Chemical reactions can be induced at a distance due to the propagation of electromagnetic signals during intermediate chemical stages. Although is is well known at optical frequencies, e.g. photosynthetic reactions, electromagnetic signals hold true for muck lower frequencies. In E. coli bacteria such electromagnetic signals can be generated by electric transitions between energy levels describing electrons moving around DNA loops. The electromagnetic signals between different bacteria within a community is a “wireless” version of intercellular communication found in bacterial communities connected by “nanowires”. The wireless broadcasts can in principle be of both the AM and FM variety due to the magnetic flux periodicity in electron energy spectra in bacterial DNA orbital motions.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2011-04-theoretical-physicists-explanation-bacteria-radio.html#jCp

Bacteria Might Communicate Using Radio Waves

The research revolves around a feature called circular DNA (DNA loops), which is found in simple organisms like viruses and bacteria. As free electrons move around these loops, a radio wave can be produced — and as quantum objects, these electrons can also take on different energy levels. It is posited that these two factors could allow bacteria to transmit radio waves at frequencies of 0.5, 1 and 1.5KHz.

 

http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/84198-bacteria-might-communicate-using-radio-waves

Take care. At least, keep your home clean from electro-magnetic waves. Sleep away from wifi and cell phone networks.

 

 

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