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Non-invasive Vagus nerve stimulation
Non-invasive Vagus nerve stimulation

Non-invasive Vagus Nerve stimulation works to treat depression.

Good enough.

Avani Avittam or Upakarma
Avani Avittam or Upakarma
yajnopa-veeta-dharana
yajnopa-veeta-dharana

But performing Upakarma during Shravan (month when chances of suffering from Vata-Prakop is highest! Hence mental disorders!) is unscientific! 🙂

But wearing Janoi behind the ear during urination is unscientific and superstition. 😀

Those who are engaged in intellectually and mentally stressful activities, do need to learn vagus nerve control. And Janoi helps here, physically and mentally.

Not only Brahmins, Dwija need it. Anyone who is involved in intense mental activities need it.

Then why not all?

Rest really don’t need it as they don’t overuse vagus nerve. 🙂

Do you take cancer drugs just for the sake of taking it? 🙂

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New Non-Invasive Form of Vagus Nerve Stimulation Works to Treat Depression

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https://www.elsevier.com/about/press-releases/research-and-journals/new-non-invasive-form-of-vagus-nerve-stimulation-works-to-treat-depression

Researchers of a new study published in the current issue of Biological Psychiatry report successful reduction of depressive symptoms in patients using a novel non-invasive method of vagus nerve stimulation, or VNS.

Despite the growing number of medications and neurostimulation approaches available, residual symptoms may be both distressing and disabling. Traditional vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a neurostimulation technique that has been used to alleviate treatment-resistant symptoms of depression. Clinical trials suggested that it produced modest benefit that emerged over long periods of time. However, it was also costly and required risky neurosurgery to implant the vagal nerve stimulators.

In this new study, Drs. Peijing Rong and Jiliang Fang at the China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, collaborating with Jian Kong’s research team at Harvard Medical School, investigated a new, modified form of VNS called transcutaneous VNS, which instead stimulates the vagus nerve through electrodes clipped onto the ear, similar to how headphones rest inside the ear.

Patients with major depressive disorder who volunteered for the study received either transcutaneous VNS or sham (placebo) VNS and underwent a functional neuroimaging scan both before and after one month of treatment.

Compared to patients who received sham VNS, the patients who received real VNS showed significant improvement of their depressive symptoms. This improvement was associated with increased functional connectivity between the default mode network and precuneus and orbital prefrontal cortex, an important network in the brain known to be altered in depression.

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