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FetalCells

Elders in family always tell that never ever disrespect pregnant mother and her wishes. Fulfill all of them unless you see them contraindicated (harmful and not good for specific month).

Here is a wonderful research showing how fetus in the womb drives mother’s health, moods and emotions. Child in womb in fact take care of mother’s health!! Protects her!!

Dramatic research has shown that during pregnancy, cells of the fetus often migrate through the placenta, taking up residence in many areas of the mother’s body, where their influence may benefit or undermine maternal health.

The presence of fetal cells in maternal tissue is known as fetal microchimerism. The term alludes to the chimeras of ancient Greek myth–composite creatures built from different animal parts, like the goat-lion-serpent depicted in an Etruscan bronze sculpture.

“Fetal cells can act as stem cells and develop into epithelial cells, specialized heart cells, liver cells and so forth. This shows that they are very dynamic and play a huge role in the maternal body. They can even migrate to the brain and differentiate into neurons,” Boddy says “We are all chimeras.”

Fetal cells may do more than simply migrate to maternal tissues. The authors suggest they can act as a sort of placenta outside the womb, redirecting essential assets from the maternal body to the developing fetus. Cells derived from the fetus–which can persist in maternal tissues for decades after a child is born–have been associated with both protection and increased susceptibility to a range of afflictions, including cancer and autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.

Take care all would-be parents!! And never life under delusion that you actually have control over your life! We all, all lifeforms are connected and we are here to help each other!!

chimerainfographic071715USE


Research


The alien within: Fetal cells influence maternal health during pregnancy (and long after)

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-08/asu-taw082515.php

Mother’s little helpers?

While fetal microchimerism is a common occurrence across placental mammals, (including humans), the effects of such cells on maternal health remain a topic of fierce debate in the biological community.

In research appearing in the advanced online edition of the journal Bioessays, Boddy and her colleagues review the available literature on fetal microchimerism and human health, applying an evolutionary framework to predict when fetal cells are inclined to act cooperatively to enhance maternal health and when their behavior is likely to be competitive, occasionally leading to adverse effects on the mother.

Fetal cells may do more than simply migrate to maternal tissues. The authors suggest they can act as a sort of placenta outside the womb, redirecting essential assets from the maternal body to the developing fetus. Cells derived from the fetus–which can persist in maternal tissues for decades after a child is born–have been associated with both protection and increased susceptibility to a range of afflictions, including cancer and autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.

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