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Pills

Don’t panic if you have taken in past. Avoid in future and take measures to reverse the effect in body by living stress-free life.

I have been vocal against idiotic Pill obsession. Mindless birth control pills in your young age will invite grave danger in menopausal age. Not only obesity but also diabetes, cancer and hormonal disorders.

It is grave mistake on govt side to promote contraceptives as birth control tools.

Not only females, newborns also suffer due to pills. Early in fetal life, nutrient deficiencies may result in severe impairments. For example, folate. Or as popularly known as : B Vitamin. Pill obsession will make your child devoid of folate in growth period as mother’s folate level reduces due to pill-intake.

Take care. Spread awareness. Save Nation.

ACCORDING TO A LOT OF DOCTORS:

Got acne? Take the pill.
Got PMS? Take the pill.
Got irregular cycles? Take the pill.
Don’t want to get pregnant? Take the pill.

All thanks parents’ pre-planning sexual indulgence and avoidance of progeny by modern pills. Folate is a vitamin that may become depleted with the use of birth control pills. Aside from the long list of potential side effects birth control pills can deplete important nutrients. These nutrients include: Vitamin B2, Vitamin B6, Vitamin B12, Folic Acid, Vitamin C, Magnesium and Zinc.

Once the pills become regular bedroom utility, body start denying absorption of nutrients. No matter how sophisticated supplements you take.

Such information is never passed-on to teens and young married couples. And so sex becomes pleasure machine for them. Instant, handy and under control. What a toxic delusion! 🙁🙁 And and top of that Idiot Chetan Bhagat tribe cry for porn freedom rights!! Ghor Kaliyug !! 🙁🙁

Spread the awareness. Save the future of Bharat.

More here : http://prachodayat.in/belong-pill-tribe/

 


Research


Contemporary Hormonal Contraception and the Risk of Breast Cancer

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1700732

Background

Little is known about whether contemporary hormonal contraception is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer.

Methods

We assessed associations between the use of hormonal contraception and the risk of invasive breast cancer in a nationwide prospective cohort study involving all women in Denmark between 15 and 49 years of age who had not had cancer or venous thromboembolism and who had not received treatment for infertility. Nationwide registries provided individually updated information about the use of hormonal contraception, breast-cancer diagnoses, and potential confounders.

Results

Among 1.8 million women who were followed on average for 10.9 years (a total of 19.6 million person-years), 11,517 cases of breast cancer occurred. As compared with women who had never used hormonal contraception, the relative risk of breast cancer among all current and recent users of hormonal contraception was 1.20 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14 to 1.26). This risk increased from 1.09 (95% CI, 0.96 to 1.23) with less than 1 year of use to 1.38 (95% CI, 1.26 to 1.51) with more than 10 years of use (P=0.002). After discontinuation of hormonal contraception, the risk of breast cancer was still higher among the women who had used hormonal contraceptives for 5 years or more than among women who had not used hormonal contraceptives. Risk estimates associated with current or recent use of various oral combination (estrogen–progestin) contraceptives varied between 1.0 and 1.6. Women who currently or recently used the progestin-only intrauterine system also had a higher risk of breast cancer than women who had never used hormonal contraceptives (relative risk, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.33). The overall absolute increase in breast cancers diagnosed among current and recent users of any hormonal contraceptive was 13 (95% CI, 10 to 16) per 100,000 person-years, or approximately 1 extra breast cancer for every 7690 women using hormonal contraception for 1 year.

Conclusions

The risk of breast cancer was higher among women who currently or recently used contemporary hormonal contraceptives than among women who had never used hormonal contraceptives, and this risk increased with longer durations of use; however, absolute increases in risk were small. (Funded by the Novo Nordisk Foundation.)

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