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Thanks to our living under continuous mass media influence, we see solutions to real problems in sentiments.

Milk production in factory like Cold-drinks and sugar production, is water intensive enterprise. Sane society would not prefer it. Esp. when we are under extreme drought conditions.

Organized dairy is one of many heavy water using industry. UNLIKE many countries, New Zealand is blessed with abundant fresh water.

Growing Chinese demand for milk powder means farmers are increasingly switching from meat production to dairy, thereby increasing their water use. Dairy farming is also polluting freshwater supplies, as phosphates and nitrates seep into groundwater. This has become a political issue, not just for the Maori: many of the rivers and lakes loved by all Kiwis are no longer safe to swim in. The most likely outcome is a fudge that avoids saying anyone owns New Zealand’s fresh water. But the Maori may get more influence over some water, or even an allocation.

Same story in India. Amul like organized dairies are no different than Coca cola and pepsi plants, polluting water and using lot of it.


Article


http://www.economist.com/news/asia/21650571-no-guarantee-against-squabbling-over-ownership-water-water-everywhere?frsc=dg%7Cd

Water, water everywhere

But no guarantee against squabbling over ownership

UNLIKE many countries, New Zealand is blessed with abundant fresh water. Its temperate climate, regular rainfall over much of the country, and thousands of lakes and rivers ensure a good supply. But who owns these larger bodies of water? The government’s answer is, no one: not the state, nor any group or individual. But some of those who have lived in New Zealand longest, the Maori, disagree.

The Maori claim a special relationship with New Zealand’s fresh water, based on their historical use of its rivers for drinking water, spiritual beliefs, fishing and shellfish harvest, transport and trade, among other things. Their case goes back to 1840, when the British Crown and most of the Maori tribes signed the Waitangi treaty, which first formalised the colonists’ settling of the islands. Maori rights were enshrined in the treaty. An interim ruling by the Waitangi tribunal, set up in 1975 to deal with Maori grievances about land and related issues, says that the Maori have freshwater rights “for which full ownership was the closest cultural equivalent in 1840.”

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