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When modern science testifies Vedic Visions, I feel jubilant! Today is one such morning!

According to a new study in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Endometrial microbiota (bacteria in the uterine cavity) play an important role in determining whether women are able to get pregnant via in vitro fertilization (IVF), according to a new study published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Now, read last year’s note (March 17, 2015)

Antiphospholipid Syndrome or antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APLS) is an autoimmune, hypercoagulable state caused by antiphospholipid antibodies. APS provokes blood clots (thrombosis) in both arteries and veins as well as pregnancy-related complications such as miscarriage, stillbirth, preterm delivery, and severe preeclampsia.

the existence of an endometrial microbiota that is highly stable during the acquisition of endometrial receptivity. However, pathological modification of its profile is associated with poor reproductive outcomes for in vitro fertilization patients. This finding adds a novel microbiological dimension to the reproductive process.

It is depressing to see thriving number of cases of this syndrome. Yesterday, I encountered 3 cases in close friend circles. Very depressing. 🙁

Why sudden rise of such rare syndromes?

Autoimmunity. APLS is an auto-immune disorder. Body’s reaction against self. Rise of rebels.

Why?

Of course, our state of the art, science-led heathcare. Antibiotics consumption, pesticides in water and soil. Just like mother earth becomes infertile after several decades of chemical farming, human mothers body also react against own self and lead to miscarriage, stillbirth, preterm delivery. 🙁 Depressing. 🙁

Solution?
Reestablish kingdom of microbes. Revere them. Respect them.
Do Hanuman Bhakti. Do Ganesh Sadhana. Respect Maruts. Microbes. Recharge your Pranamay body which is almost dead by combating against chemical warfare (Antibiotics, vaccines, pesticides in food and water).

Eat microbially blessed food from farms who grow food with the help of Gau mata.

Take prasad of Gau mata (milk, ghee, curd) when milk is ethically procured.

Do Gau seva. Spend time in Gau shala.

Do Prithvi seva. Spend time for farming.

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पुनर्गर्भत्वमेरिरे | (ऋग्वेद १|६|४)

पुनः गर्भत्वं एरिरे |

मरुत वीरोंको बार बार गर्भवासमें रहना पड़ता है|

Microbes have to reestablish colonies in womb(female reproductive track) again and again.

<big>Research hints</big>

Microbes in female reproductive organs play critical role in maintaining fertility to pregnancy to successful child birth. To do all these actions, they again and again reestablish this critical tract so that pathogens do not grow in this highly fertile land. women of reproductive age carry bacteria, primarily lactobacilli, which make the vaginal canal more acidic. This environment provides a hardy defense against dangerous bacteria that are sensitive to acid. Lactobacilli also have evolved a potent arsenal of molecules that inhibit or kill other bacteria. पुनः गर्भत्वं एरिरे | 🙂

Most crucial newborn’s sterile Gut and skin gets healthy bacteria from mother when it passed through vaginal canal (Critically miss in C-section delivery). And for this to happen, पुनः गर्भत्वं एरिरे | 🙂

Microbes play a hidden role in the course of every pregnancy. For example, have you ever wondered why pregnant women gain more weight than can be accounted for by the size of their fetus and placenta? Bacteria are an answer. And to do this job पुनः गर्भत्वं एरिरे |
🙂

(Mothers need to store more energy to optimize the success of their newborns. To help them, significant change happens in their microbial flora during last trimester when max weight gain is observed for majority.This is the period when infant’s brain is under crucial development. For them, extra energy storage is required so that seamless development occurs.

Microbial flora change during this time shift their net metabolism so that more calories flow from food to her body. In this way, her microbes increase the odds that there will be a next generation, one that will provide a new home for them.)

Modern medicine says that Womb is highly sterile environment but my Gut feeling says that it is not. It is full of मरुत वीर army, helping sperm and ovum to unite. I feel so because same microbial movement outside womb plans child birth event. During pregnancy, these tiger-mother lactobacilli flourish and predominate, crowding out other resident species and potential invaders. They are gearing up for the main event—birth—which occurs around the thirty-eighth or thirty-ninth week of most pregnancies. It is due to them why one woman is two weeks “early” while another is one week “late.” And for all these tasks, पुनः गर्भत्वं एरिरे | 🙂

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Suggestion:
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It critical for mother to listen Sundar Kand during pregnancy. If she reads Ramayana along, best! Reason? मारुति नन्दन , Vayu Putra Hanuman in memory and imagery of mother ‘s mind will help मरुत वीर army to do their job properly. (This is my observation. do not ask proofs 🙂. Experiment. Ask pregnany females in your family to recite Ramayana and Sundar kand loudly daily)

Side note: Marut(s) in our environment impregnate clouds and bring rain. Connect the dots.


Related Research


Uterine Microbiota Play a Key Role in Implantation and Pregnancy Success in in vitro Fertilization

06 December 2016 Elsevier

“The uterine cavity has been considered sterile,” explained lead investigator Carlos Simón, MD, PhD, of Igenomix Spain, and the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the University of Valencia, Spain. “Our team sought to test the existence of endometrial microbiota that differs from that of the vagina. We assessed its hormonal regulation and analyzed the impact of the endometrial microbial community on reproductive outcome in patients undergoing IVF.”

To identify the existence of an endometrial microbiota, investigators evaluated paired samples of endometrial and vaginal fluid obtained from 13 fertile women in pre-receptive and receptive phases within the same menstrual cycle. To investigate the hormonal regulation of the endometrial microbiota during the acquisition of endometrial receptivity, endometrial fluid was collected at pre-receptive and receptive phases within the same cycle from 22 fertile women. Finally, the reproductive impact of an altered endometrial microbiota in endometrial fluid was assessed by implantation, ongoing pregnancy, and live birth rates in 35 infertile patients undergoing IVF with a receptive endometrium diagnosed using the endometrial receptivity array based on gene expression.

When paired endometrial fluid and vaginal fluid samples from the same patients were examined, different bacterial communities were detected between the two sites in some women. The microbiota in the endometrial fluid was classified as Lactobacillus-dominated or non-Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota. There was no evidence that steroid hormones played a role in determining the composition of the microbial community in the endometrium. On the other hand, women with a non-Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota and a receptive endometrium had a significantly lower rate of implantation, pregnancy, and live birth than patients with a Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota.

In an accompanying commentary, Linda C. Giudice, MD, PhD, Distinguished Professor and reproductive endocrinologist at the University of California San Francisco, noted that reproductive success is clearly not solely defined by endometrial histology and gene expression. The ongoing revolution in technology, multiple -omics, and multidimensional data analysis has opened the window of implantation to a greater level of scrutiny. It is time to investigate the endometrial microbiome and expand research to its virome, fungome, epigenome, and metabolome, she wrote.

Putting the significance of this study into perspective, Roberto Romero, MD, DMedSci, Chief of the Perinatology Research Branch of NICHD/NIH and Editor-in-Chief for Obstetrics of the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, commented that “the endometrial cavity is not sterile and normally contains bacteria; however, whether bacteria within the cavity play a role in successful reproduction has been unknown to this point. The pioneering work of the team of Professor Simón now shows, for the first time, that colonization of the uterine cavity with some bacteria (non Lactobacillus-dominated) affects the success of in vitro fertilization, pregnancy rates, and live births. This brings hope that diagnostic tests to examine the microbial composition of the uterine cavity may be valuable in assessing the likelihood of success of IVF. Moreover, it raises the question of whether targeted treatment with antimicrobial agents or probiotics may be useful in improving reproductive success, and suggests that successful reproduction may depend on a host-microbial relationship in the endometrial cavity, unknown before this time.”

Evidence that the endometrial microbiota has an effect on implantation success or failure

Background

Bacterial cells in the human body account for 1–3% of total body weight and are at least equal in number to human cells. Recent research has focused on understanding how the different bacterial communities in the body (eg, gut, respiratory, skin, and vaginal microbiomes) predispose to health and disease. The microbiota of the reproductive tract has been inferred from the vaginal bacterial communities, and the uterus has been classically considered a sterile cavity. However, while the vaginal microbiota has been investigated in depth, there is a paucity of consistent data regarding the existence of an endometrial microbiota and its possible impact in reproductive function.

Objective

This study sought to test the existence of an endometrial microbiota that differs from that in the vagina, assess its hormonal regulation, and analyze the impact of the endometrial microbial community on reproductive outcome in infertile patients undergoing in vitro fertilization.

Study Design

To identify the existence of an endometrial microbiota, paired samples of endometrial fluid and vaginal aspirates were obtained simultaneously from 13 fertile women in prereceptive and receptive phases within the same menstrual cycle (total samples analyzed n = 52). To investigate the hormonal regulation of the endometrial microbiota during the acquisition of endometrial receptivity, endometrial fluid was collected at prereceptive and receptive phases within the same cycle from 22 fertile women (n = 44). Finally, the reproductive impact of an altered endometrial microbiota in endometrial fluid was assessed by implantation, ongoing pregnancy, and live birth rates in 35 infertile patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (total samples n = 41) with a receptive endometrium diagnosed using the endometrial receptivity array. Genomic DNA was obtained either from endometrial fluid or vaginal aspirate and sequenced by 454 pyrosequencing of the V3–V5 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene; the resulting sequences were taxonomically assigned using QIIME. Data analysis was performed using R packages. The χ2 test, Student t test, and analysis of variance were used for statistical analyses.

Results

When bacterial communities from paired endometrial fluid and vaginal aspirate samples within the same subjects were interrogated, different bacterial communities were detected between the uterine cavity and the vagina of some subjects. Based on its composition, the microbiota in the endometrial fluid, comprising up to 191 operational taxonomic units, was defined as a Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota (>90% Lactobacillusspp.) or a non-Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota (<90% Lactobacillus spp. with >10% of other bacteria). Although the endometrial microbiota was not hormonally regulated during the acquisition of endometrial receptivity, the presence of a non-Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota in a receptive endometrium was associated with significant decreases in implantation [60.7% vs 23.1% (P = .02)], pregnancy [70.6% vs 33.3% (P = .03)], ongoing pregnancy [58.8% vs 13.3% (P = .02)], and live birth [58.8% vs 6.7% (P = .002)] rates.

Conclusion

Our results demonstrate the existence of an endometrial microbiota that is highly stable during the acquisition of endometrial receptivity. However, pathological modification of its profile is associated with poor reproductive outcomes for in vitro fertilization patients. This finding adds a novel microbiological dimension to the reproductive process.

 

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