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Kenya Honda, Science/AAAS (21 January 2011)
Kenya Honda, Science/AAAS (21 January 2011)

Food allergies have increased about 50% in children since 1997. I see children with diet restrictions. I see toddlers with long list of ‘No to eat’ list. This is the price we pay for disrespecting microbes, our friends, philosophers and guides.

Microbes can save growing epedemic of allergies. Respect them. Take care of them. Eat GUT-friendly food. Do not treat your body as gutter by eating anything and everything at anytime.

Include microbe-rich ghee, honey, dahi, butter-milk in regular diet.


Research


http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2014/08/gut-microbe-stops-food-allergies

A gut microbe that stops food allergies

A class of bacteria commonly found in the guts of people—and rodents—appears to keep mice safe from food allergies, a study suggests. The same bacteria are among those reduced by antibiotic use in early childhood. The research fits neatly into an emerging paradigm that helps explain a recent alarming increase in food allergies and other conditions, such as obesity and autoimmune disease, and hints at strategies to reverse the trend.

Food allergies have increased about 50% in children since 1997. There are various theories explaining why. One is that the 21st century lifestyle, which includes a diet very different from our ancestors’, lots of antibiotic use, and even a rise in cesarean section deliveries, has profoundly changed the makeup of microbes in the gut of many people in developed countries. For example, the average child in the United States has taken three courses of antibiotics by the time he or she is 2 years old, says Martin Blaser, an infectious disease specialist and microbiologist at New York University in New York City. (See here for more on the reach of microbiome research these days.)

Cathryn Nagler, an immunologist at the University of Chicago in Illinois, has spent years probing links between the immune system, intestinal bacteria, and the onset of allergies. Back in 2004, she and her colleagues reported that wiping out gut bacteria in mice led to food allergies. Since then, Nagler has continued trying to understand which bacteria offer allergy protection and how they accomplish that.

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