SHARE

Viruses

Under the toxic influence of mass mediums like movies, newspapers and TV news, we now really don’t remember and respect our ancestors.

श्राद्ध & पितृ तर्पण (tarapana) – We do it every year and get invisible help from ancestors legacy.

पितृ दोष – nothing but the physical and mental anomalies.

“Roughly eight percent of our DNA comes from viruses that infected our ancestors millions of years ago. New research by geneticists shows that more than an oddity, the viral DNA switches on genes responsible for initiating an immune response. When removed, the innate immune system — a first-responder to infection by pathogens including viruses — does not function properly. The study shows that viral DNA functions in our body by helping us fight infections.”

To activate or deactivate these genes is really a mental task. And a weak mind cannot receive help from the past. Nor the future can help.


http://healthcare.utah.edu/publicaffairs/news/2016/03/invaders-in-your-dna.php

Ancient Viral Invaders in Our DNA Help Fight Today’s Infections


Regulatory evolution of innate immunity through co-option of endogenous retroviruses

Abstract

Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are abundant in mammalian genomes and contain sequences modulating transcription. The impact of ERV propagation on the evolution of gene regulation remains poorly understood. We found that ERVs have shaped the evolution of a transcriptional network underlying the interferon (IFN) response, a major branch of innate immunity, and that lineage-specific ERVs have dispersed numerous IFN-inducible enhancers independently in diverse mammalian genomes. CRISPR-Cas9 deletion of a subset of these ERV elements in the human genome impaired expression of adjacent IFN-induced genes and revealed their involvement in the regulation of essential immune functions, including activation of the AIM2 inflammasome. Although these regulatory sequences likely arose in ancient viruses, they now constitute a dynamic reservoir of IFN-inducible enhancers fueling genetic innovation in mammalian immune defenses.

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/351/6277/1083

 

LEAVE A REPLY