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In our race to hug western way of living, we are unknowingly inviting doomed future for our next generation.

As per below research, exposure to chemical BPA used in plastics may be more likely to develop symptoms of anxiety and depression at age 10-12.

Plastic love and BPA exposure
Plastic love and BPA exposure
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Prenatal BPA Exposure Linked to Anxiety and Depression in Boys

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935116303152

https://www.mailman.columbia.edu/public-health-now/news/prenatal-bpa-exposure-linked-anxiety-and-depression-boys

BPA is a component of some plastics and is found in food containers, plastic water bottles, dental sealants, and thermal receipt paper. In the body, BPA is a synthetic estrogen, one of the class of chemicals known as “endocrine disruptors.” The Columbia researchers, led byFrederica Perera, PhD, DrPH, director of CCCEH, previously reported that prenatal exposure to BPA was associated with emotionally reactive and aggressive behavior, and more symptoms of anxiety and depression in boys at age 7-9.

Perera and her co-investigators followed 241 nonsmoking pregnant women and their children, a subset of CCCEH’s longstanding urban birth cohort study in New York City, from pregnancy through childhood. To measure the amount of BPA that had been absorbed in the body, researchers collected a urine sample from the mothers during the third trimester of their pregnancy, and from the children at age 3 and age 5. At ages 10-12, children completed an interview with a trained researcher about their symptoms of depression and completed a self-assessment that measures anxiety.

Abstract

Significant positive associations between prenatal BPA and symptoms of depression and anxiety were observed among boys. Postnatal BPA exposure was not significantly associated with outcomes. There was substantial co-occurrence of anxiety and depressive symptoms in this sample.

 

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