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Tree of Life
Img Src: https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/ec/79/d2/ec79d24ccd98700a5a4b982f95d90744.jpg

All Sanatana Dharma scriptures talks about dissolving false ego ‘I’ or अहंकार. There is nothing like ‘I’. It is your false ego. There is indeed thin line by which you can recognize end of you and start of environment.

And this life is never for self but to serve others. I tried example of microbes and their friendship with us several times to show this synergy and border-less body we have.

The real life starts when you dissolve this false arrogance of being ‘I’. I am something. I am doctor. i am engineer. I am Mr. XYZ 😀

Taking care of body is highest धर्म (duty). It is सेवा of all microbial societies forming your body. It is सेवा of all molecular bodies giving you luxury of false ego.

शरीर
शरीरमाद्यं खलु धर्मसाधनम् ।
शरीर धर्म पालन का पहला साधन है ।

Not eating food your body wants, not doing exercise, taking too much stress,taking mindless chemicals in form of medicines — All of these are Karmic crimes against lower worlds serving as your body!!

Now science is preaching same.


Reference


The pronoun ‘I’ is becoming obsolete

http://news.vanderbilt.edu/2015/08/the-pronoun-i-is-becoming-obsolete/

Recent microbiological research has shown that thinking of plants and animals, including humans, as autonomous individuals is a serious over-simplification.

A series of groundbreaking studies have revealed that what we have always thought of as individuals are actually “biomolecular networks” that consist of visible hosts plus millions of invisible microbes that have a significant effect on how the host develops, the diseases it catches, how it behaves and possibly even its social interactions.

It’s a case of the whole being greater than the sum of its parts,” said Seth Bordenstein, associate professor of biological sciences at Vanderbilt University, who has contributed to the body of scientific knowledge that is pointing to the conclusion that symbiotic microbes play a fundamental role in virtually all aspects of plant and animal biology, including the origin of new species.

Host Biology in Light of the Microbiome: Ten Principles of Holobionts and Hologenomes

http://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/article?id=10.1371/journal.pbio.1002226

Groundbreaking research on the universality and diversity of microorganisms is now challenging the life sciences to upgrade fundamental theories that once seemed untouchable. To fully appreciate the change that the field is now undergoing, one has to place the epochs and foundational principles of Darwin, Mendel, and the modern synthesis in light of the current advances that are enabling a new vision for the central importance of microbiology. Animals and plants are no longer heralded as autonomous entities but rather as biomolecular networks composed of the host plus its associated microbes, i.e., “holobionts.” As such, their collective genomes forge a “hologenome,” and models of animal and plant biology that do not account for these intergenomic associations are incomplete. Here, we integrate these concepts into historical and contemporary visions of biology and summarize a predictive and refutable framework for their evaluation. Specifically, we present ten principles that clarify and append what these concepts are and are not, explain how they both support and extend existing theory in the life sciences, and discuss their potential ramifications for the multifaceted approaches of zoology and botany. We anticipate that the conceptual and evidence-based foundation provided in this essay will serve as a roadmap for hypothesis-driven, experimentally validated research on holobionts and their hologenomes, thereby catalyzing the continued fusion of biology’s subdisciplines. At a time when symbiotic microbes are recognized as fundamental to all aspects of animal and plant biology, the holobiont and hologenome concepts afford a holistic view of biological complexity that is consistent with the generally reductionist approaches of biology.

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