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Gut, Vagus nerve and mind cotnrol
Gut, Vagus nerve and mind cotnrol

We discussed this last week. We are guest and they are host. They control our lives and we facilitate.

How could they send messages -> Using vagus nerve.

How do you control messages? By controlling vagus nerve.

What can help to control vagus nerve so that you are always in good mood? Yagnopavit (जनेऊ). When we encircle ear during urination or passing stool, we control Vagus nerve. And by that we control internal movement of GUT so no excess Apana Vayu is exchanged with environment.

Yagnopavit and Vagus nerve
Yagnopavit and Vagus nerve

“Microbes have the capacity to manipulate behavior and mood through altering the neural signals in the vagus nerve, changing taste receptors, producing toxins to make us feel bad, and releasing chemical rewards to make us feel good,”

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About VAgus nerve

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Gut controlled mind
Gut controlled mind

The vagus nerve supplies motor parasympathetic fibers to all the organs except the suprarenal (adrenal) glands, from the neck down to the second segment of the transverse colon. The vagus also controls a few skeletal muscles, notable ones being:

Cricothyroid muscle
Levator veli palatini muscle
Salpingopharyngeus muscle
Palatoglossus muscle
Palatopharyngeus muscle
Superior, middle and inferior pharyngeal constrictors
Muscles of the larynx (speech).

This means that the vagus nerve is responsible for such varied tasks as heart rate, gastrointestinal peristalsis, sweating, and quite a few muscle movements in the mouth, including speech (via the recurrent laryngeal nerve). It also has some afferent fibers that innervate the inner (canal) portion of the outer ear (via the auricular branch, also known as Alderman’s nerve) and part of the meninges. This explains why a person may cough when tickled on the ear, such as when trying to remove ear wax with a cotton swab.

Do Gut Bacteria Rule Our Minds?

http://www.ucsf.edu/news/2014/08/116526/do-gut-bacteria-rule-our-minds

In an Ecosystem Within Us, Microbes Evolved to Sway Food Choices

A Power Struggle Inside the Gut

Bacterial species vary in the nutrients they need. Some prefer fat, and others sugar, for instance. But they not only vie with each other for food and to retain a niche within their ecosystem – our digestive tracts – they also often have different aims than we do when it comes to our own actions, according to senior author Athena Aktipis, PhD, co-founder of the Center for Evolution and Cancer with the Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCSF.

 

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