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Obsession for Chaotic music - Vata Symptoms
Obsession for Chaotic music – Vata Symptoms

Everyone loves music. It is our natural inborn liking. It is representation of our वात element. Moderate listening is good for health. But when someone is having obsession of listening music day and night, it is called गान्धर्व चित्त. Symptom of elevated वात. On top of it, if someone is having obsession of listening cacophony (A loud harsh music of current times), it is surely a symptom of derangement of वात.

Listening music while running? Elevated Vata
Listening music while running? Elevated Vata

On the other hand, if you sense your kid is having Vata heavy prakruti, experiment music training. He or she may become great musician.


Research – What modern science says?


Earbuds obsession?
Earbuds obsession?

Broadened Population-Level Frequency Tuning in Human Auditory Cortex of Portable Music Player Users

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0017022

High-volume portable music players may impair ability to clearly discriminate sounds

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2011-03/nifp-hpm030911.php

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Growing numbers of people enjoy listening to music on portable music players or cell phones, and many tend to turn up the volume, especially in noisy surroundings.

Nowadays, many people use portable players to enrich their daily life with enjoyable music. However, in noisy environments, the player volume is often set to extremely high levels in order to drown out the intense ambient noise and satisfy the appetite for music. Extensive and inappropriate usage of portable music players might cause subtle damages in the auditory system, which are not behaviorally detectable in an early stage of the hearing impairment progress.

Our conclusion is that extensive and inadequate usage of portable music players could cause subtle damages, which standard behavioral audiometric measures fail to detect in an early stage. However, these damages could lead to future irreversible hearing disorders, which would have a huge negative impact on the quality of life of those affected, and the society as a whole.

Hooked on Headphones? Personal Listening Devices Can Harm Hearing

http://www.cfah.org/hbns/2010/hooked-on-headphones-personal-listening-devices-can-harm-hearing

Personal listening devices like iPods have become increasingly popular among young — and not-so-young — people in recent years. But music played through headphones too loud or too long might pose a significant risk to hearing, according to a 24-year study of adolescent girls.

The study, which appears online in theJournal of Adolescent Health, involved 8,710 girls of lower socioeconomic status, whose average age was about 16. They underwent hearing tests when they entered a residential facility in the U.S Northeast.

“I had the rare opportunity, as an audiologist, to see how this population changed over the years,” said Abbey Berg, Ph.D., lead study author and a professor in the Department of Biology & Health Sciences at Pace University in New York.

In this period, high-frequency hearing loss — a common casualty of excessive noise exposure — nearly doubled, from 10.1 percent in 1985 to 19.2 percent in 2008, she found.

Today’s teenagers could become prematurely hearing-impaired, study warns

Tinnitus, often a symptom of hearing loss, can result from constant use of earphones and frequenting very noisy places

http://www.nature.com/articles/srep27109

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-07/fda-ttc071216.php

Recent neuroscience research suggests that tinnitus may reflect synaptic loss in the cochlea that does not express in the audiogram but leads to neural changes in auditory pathways that reduce sound level tolerance (SLT). Adolescents (N = 170) completed a questionnaire addressing their prior experience with tinnitus, potentially risky listening habits, and sensitivity to ordinary sounds, followed by psychoacoustic measurements in a sound booth. Among all adolescents 54.7% reported by questionnaire that they had previously experienced tinnitus, while 28.8% heard tinnitus in the booth. Psychoacoustic properties of tinnitus measured in the sound booth corresponded with those of chronic adult tinnitus sufferers. Neither hearing thresholds (≤15 dB HL to 16 kHz) nor otoacoustic emissions discriminated between adolescents reporting or not reporting tinnitus in the sound booth, but loudness discomfort levels (a psychoacoustic measure of SLT) did so, averaging 11.3 dB lower in adolescents experiencing tinnitus in the acoustic chamber. Although risky listening habits were near universal, the teenagers experiencing tinnitus and reduced SLT tended to be more protective of their hearing. Tinnitus and reduced SLT could be early indications of a vulnerability to hidden synaptic injury that is prevalent among adolescents and expressed following exposure to high level environmental sounds.

Going to the gym shouldn’t be a workout for your eardrums

UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2010-01/uoa-gtt012010.php

Listening to an iPod while working out feels like second nature to many people, but University of Alberta researcher Bill Hodgetts says we need to consider the volume levels in our earphones while working up a sweat.

Hodgetts, assistant professor in the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology at the Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, says his research has found that exercising in a gym often prompts people to turn up the volume to potentially unsafe levels for the ear.

The researcher found that the study participants, who were in a gym-like setting, listened at potentially dangerous levels while working out, likely due to the presence of background noise. But he says it isn’t the listening level alone that’s risky, it’s how long a person listens at that level. What Hodgetts found is that almost half of his study participants listened for a length of time during exercise that put them at risk for hearing loss.

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