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Oil is a type of lipid known as a triglyceride. Solid triglycerides are called fats and liquid triglycerides are called oils. Credit: Thomas Vogel/E+/Getty Images
Oil is a type of lipid known as a triglyceride. Solid triglycerides are called fats and liquid triglycerides are called oils. Credit: Thomas Vogel/E+/Getty Images

Autism is mere one aspect of learning anomalies and it is spreading dangerously across all countries embracing western life style.

There are several reasons for high lipid level in blood. Two prime reasons I see behind them are – careless young couples’ apathy towards child planning and development.

Stress can cause high lipid levels. Many career aspirant married females in west and now in Indian society, takes too much stress during their most fertile years of the life. This lead to continuous high lipid level in blood.

Another reason is fat-heavy food + lack of exercise in life routine.
Unfortunately, this high lipid level causes learning disabilities in future generations.

Why curse future generation for our foolish rat-race?

Take a break. Plan your baby at ease. Earn little less but gift a best future citizen to Nation. Please, take care. Career can wait, nation cannot. Nation demands best progeny from you.


Research


Lipid levels during prenatal brain development impact autism: York U study

In a groundbreaking York University study, researchers have found that abnormal levels of lipid molecules in the brain can affect the interaction between two key neural pathways in early prenatal brain development, which can trigger autism. In addition, environmental causes such as exposure to chemicals in some cosmetics and common over-the-counter medication can affect the levels of these lipids.

“We have found that the abnormal level of a lipid molecule called Prostaglandin E2 in the brain can affect the function of Wnt proteins. It is important because this can change the course of early embryonic development,” explains Professor Dorota Crawford, Faculty of Health, who is a member of the York Autism Alliance Research Group.

This is the first time research shows evidence for cross-talk between PGE2 and Wnt signalling in neuronal stem cells, according to the peer reviewed study published in Cell Communication and Signaling.

Lead researcher and York U doctoral student Christine Wong adds, “Using real-time imaging microscopy, we determined that higher levels of PGE2 can change Wnt-dependent behaviour of neural stem cells by increasing cell migration or proliferation. As a result, this could affect how the brain is organized and wired. Moreover, we found that an elevated level of PGE2 can increase expression of Wnt-regulated genes – Ctnnb1, Ptgs2, Ccnd1, and Mmp9. Interestingly, all these genes have been previously implicated in various autism studies.”

Autism is considered to be the primary disorder of brain development, with symptoms ranging from mild to severe, including repetitive behaviour, deficits in social interaction, and impaired language. It is four times more prevalent in boys than in girls, and the incidence continues to rise. The US Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data from 2010 estimates that 1 in 68 children now have autism.

“The statistics are alarming,” says Crawford. “It’s 30 per cent higher than the previous estimate of 1 in 88 children, up from only two years earlier. Perhaps we can no longer attribute this rise in autism incidence to better diagnostic tools or awareness of autism.

“It’s even more apparent from the recent literature that the environment might have a greater impact on vulnerable genes, particularly in pregnancy. Our study provides some molecular evidence that the environment likely disrupts certain events occurring in early brain development and contributes to autism.”

Lipid levels during prenatal brain development impact autism: York U study

STRESS and Lipid Levels

Elevated lipid levels in vietnam veterans with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder

Abstract

Background: Elevated cholesterol levels have been reported in panic disorder and anger attacks, but not major depression. No data have been reported in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Methods: Seventy-three male Vietnam veterans with chronic (PTSD) had serum lipid screening upon entry to a 90-day inpatient program.

Results: Elevated cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, and reduced high-density lipoprotein, were frequent in Vietnam veterans with chronic PTSD and are significant risk factors for coronary artery disease.

Conclusions: Routine lipid screening may be warranted in this at-risk population. Altered lipid levels may result from activation of the noradrenergic system.

http://www.biologicalpsychiatryjournal.com/article/S0006-3223(98)00059-6/abstract

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