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It is now evident that India never needed Green Revolution. It was all made up to sell filthy agri technology. Climate conditions and richness of weather and terrain of India was always enough to feed her subjects.

Western researchers are now teaching us our traditions (like here crop swap) so that we can recover from green revolution damage.

Despite so called ‘Revolution’, India still has nutrient-deficient population. Don’t blame population growth. Blame faulty strategies and blind surrender to Agri Tech.

India will need to feed approximately 394 million more people by 2050, and that’s going to be a significant challenge. Nutrient deficiencies are already widespread in India today—30 percent or more are anemic—and many regions are chronically water-stressed. Making matters worse, evidence suggests that monsoons are delivering less rainfall than they used to.

Now, they openly confess issues with modern chemical based agriculture.

Starting in the 1960s, a boom in rice and wheat production helped reduce hunger throughout India. Unfortunately, this Green Revolution also took a toll on the environment, increasing demands on the water supply, greenhouse gas emissions, and pollution from fertilizer.

“If we continue to go the route of rice and wheat, with unsustainable resource use and increasing climate variability, it’s unclear how long we could keep that practice up,” says Kyle Davis, a fellow at Columbia University’s Earth Institute and lead author on the new study. “That’s why we’re thinking of ways to better align food security and environmental goals.”

And what solution do they propose?

The potential benefits of replacing rice with alternative crops varied widely between different regions, depending on how much the crops could rely on rainfall instead of irrigation. But overall, the researchers found that replacing rice with maize, finger millet, pearl millet, or sorghum could reduce irrigation water demand by 33 percent, while improving production of iron by 27 percent and zinc by 13 percent.

Intelligent civilisation, living life by considering nature as mother, will never plan exotic food. Even rice is exotic for Indian regions where rain and water is not sufficient. But we do grow rice in Rajasthan and Gujarat! Pathetic! Our food was always based on local climate conditions. Now, this is what research is prescribing!

They found that rice is the least water-efficient cereal when it comes to producing nutrients, and that wheat has been the main driver in increasing irrigation stresses.

Rice couldn’t be staple food for all. Same goes with wheat! So what solution do scientists have?

Millets!

Momentum is already growing in support of alternative grains. Some Indian states are have already started pilot programs to grow more of these crops, and the Indian government is calling 2018 the ‘Year of Millets.’

“If the government is able to get people more interested in eating millets, the production will organically respond to that,” says Davis. “If you have more demand, then people will pay a better price for it, and farmers will be more willing to plant it.”

Reference: [Columbia Uni] http://blogs.ei.columbia.edu/2018/07/04/india-crop-swapping-water-nutrition/

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