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scott-umstattd-137399Pic byScott Umstattd
What you are performing now, is not your best potential. Man’s best potential is observed where suitable culture and rituals are observed.

For our unlimited quest of urbanization, we uproot humans in mass. And hence, we compromise with their potential.

Tribals are forced to leave land and migrate to cities so that city can get cheap labor. After tribal, now it is farmers’ turn. For elites of the world, this is best way to do population control. Uproot the mass and they will, like uprooted plant, die gradually, naturally.

“Once separated from their lands, tribal peoples begin to lose the traditions, skills and knowledge that together weave the tapestry of identity; thus follows a profound decrease in mental and physical health.”


Research


On the ‘wild’, human imagination and tribal peoples

How the western concept of the wild and conservation policies have affected tribal peoples

Today there are an estimated 120,000 protected areas worldwide, covering nearly 15% of the world’s land surface. Conservation is undoubtedly vital when the biological diversity of the planet is so threatened. But the sorry backdrop to these statistics — the story that is overlooked in the desire to preserve the ‘wild’ — is one of intense human suffering. For in the creation of reserves, millions of people — most of them tribal — have been evicted from their homes.

In India, hundreds of thousands of people have already been displaced from parks in the name of conservation, while in Africa mass evictions from protected areas have taken place, including the Batwa ‘pygmies’, who were forcibly moved from Uganda’s Bwindi Forest in order to protect the mountain gorillas and the Waliangulu people of Kenya, who once lived in the Tsavo Park area. ‘This variant of land theft is rapidly emerging as one of the biggest problems confronting indigenous peoples today,’ says Stephen Corry of Survival International.

For tribal peoples, it matters little whether the theft of their homelands has been for conservation or commercial reasons. Dispossessing indigenous owners for conservation may appear more benign, but for tribal peoples the consequences are similarly catastrophic. Once separated from their lands, tribal peoples begin to lose the traditions, skills and knowledge that together weave the tapestry of identity; thus follows a profound decrease in mental and physical health.

Lands are equally ‘divorced’ from the indigenous owners. 80% of the world’s biologically rich areas are the territories of tribal communities who, for millennia, have found ingenious ways of catering for their needs and maintaining the ecological balance of their surroundings. Such sustainable principles are evident in the health of the Amazon: much of the rainforest that lies outside tribal reserves has been denuded, whereas within indigenous areas it largely remains intact. Similarly, the only remaining rainforest on the Andaman Islands is found within the Jarawa peoples’ reserve. It is often precisely because ‘wild’ places have been looked after by their indigenous guardians that they have been chosen by conservationists as reserves.

http://www.survivalinternational.org/articles/3174-wilderness-the-human-imagination-and-tribal-peoples

 

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