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I have hypothesis or say interpretation about Sita’s Agni Pariksha followed by transfer to Vashishtha Rishi’s ashram. To me, this was well-planned decision. Sita living in hermitage, in forest, giving birth to Luv and Kush, is perfect plan to me.

Child development in forest, with all sort of mother nature’s immune and intellect boosters.

Similarly, birth of Shri Krishna was in highly urbanized Mathura and grooming of Avtar is not possible in urban place. So? Arrangements were made so that Krishna can be groomed in natural environment, in vicinity of cows. Nanda’s home was perfect for it.

Key takeaways
  • Adult men who had grown up in the country with pets had a healthier immune response to stress than those who grew up pet-free in the city, a new study shows.
  • The study is the first in humans to suggest the ‘hygiene hypothesis’ applies to mental health too.
  • Exposure to beneficial microorganisms in childhood may lead to better mental health in adulthood.

No ancient Gurukul(s) were established in cities. All of them in jungle. We are known as अरण्य संस्कृति. I have written in past that Gau-shala was inseparable part of gurukul institution. All students had primary responsibility to offer seva at Gurukul’s gau shala.

In short, from birth to end of Brahmcharya (Age 0 to age 25), it was essential for child to live in natural forest like environment with constant touch with animals and trees.

Now, read this research. They talk about pets. Dogs and cats. But cats and dogs have their own issues (and diseases). The perfect synergy is with cows.


Research


How growing up with pets, dust may boost mental health

Children raised in a rural environment, surrounded by animals and bacteria-laden dust, grow up to have more stress-resilient immune systems and might be at lower risk of mental illness than pet-free city dwellers, according to new research published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

The study, co-authored by researchers from the University of Ulm in Germany and CU Boulder, adds to mounting evidence supporting the “hygiene hypothesis,” which posits that overly sterile environments can breed health problems.

Key takeaways
  • Adult men who had grown up in the country with pets had a healthier immune response to stress than those who grew up pet-free in the city, a new study shows.
  • The study is the first in humans to suggest the ‘hygiene hypothesis’ applies to mental health too.
  • Exposure to beneficial microorganisms in childhood may lead to better mental health in adulthood.

The research also suggests that raising kids around pets might be good for mental health—for reasons people might not expect.

Ref: https://www.colorado.edu/today/2018/04/30/how-growing-pets-dust-may-boost-mental-health

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