Parenting

Parenting

Sperm carries information about dad’s weight

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Sperm carries information about dad’s weight
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More and more evidences are noted in recent times for common sense we all have that we give significant legacy to next generation. And that is not limited to genes. The local environment with sperm (epegenetic factors) and global environment (home, air, water, food, work profession etc) too play role.

So essentially, we don’t live for us but for future.

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Turns out dads are also eating for two. A study published December 3 in Cell Metabolism reveals that a man’s weight affects the heritable information contained in sperm. The sperm cells of lean and obese men possess different epigenetic marks, notable at gene regions associated with the control of appetite. The comparisons, which included 13 lean men and 10 obese men, offer one biological explanation for why children of obese fathers are themselves more predisposed to obesity.

Live your young age sensibly. Guide teens and educate them about disastrous impact of their addictions and obsessions.

Don’t be selfish.


Research


Obesity and Bariatric Surgery Drive Epigenetic Variation of Spermatozoa in Humans

Obesity is a heritable disorder, with children of obese fathers at higher risk of developing obesity. Environmental factors epigenetically influence somatic tissues, but the contribution of these factors to the establishment of epigenetic patterns in human gametes is unknown. Here, we hypothesized that weight loss remodels the epigenetic signature of spermatozoa in human obesity. Comprehensive profiling of the epigenome of sperm from lean and obese men showed similar histone positioning, but small non-coding RNA expression and DNA methylation patterns were markedly different. In a separate cohort of morbidly obese men, surgery-induced weight loss was associated with a dramatic remodeling of sperm DNA methylation, notably at genetic locations implicated in the central control of appetite. Our data provide evidence that the epigenome of human spermatozoa dynamically changes under environmental pressure and offers insight into how obesity may propagate metabolic dysfunction to the next generation.

http://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/abstract/S1550-4131(15)00571-9?_returnURL=http%3A%2F%2Flinkinghub.elsevier.com%2Fretrieve%2Fpii%2FS1550413115005719%3Fshowall%3Dtrue

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