Bacteria

Bacteria

Bacteria: Our friends

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Bacteria our friends, really?

Bacteria are our friends. Viruses are our messengers.
When we kill both the friends and their messengers, we are doomed.
It is high time we look at science of health with new fresh holistic perspective.

We may think of ourselves as just human, but we’re really a mass of microorganisms housed in a human shell. Every person alive is host to about 100 trillion bacterial cells. They outnumber human cells 10 to one and account for 99.9 percent of the unique genes in the body.
Our collection of microbiota, known as the microbiome, is the human equivalent of an environmental ecosystem. Although the bacteria together weigh a mere three pounds, their composition determines much about how the body functions and, alas, sometimes malfunctions.
In short, what we are boast as body, is nothing but gift of our friends i.e.Bacteria. What we call ‘I’ is nothing but summation of Ego of all bacterial communities we host. Our habits, our responses are governed by them. As per one research, our cravings for specific food taste is also governed by these tiny little friends living in our body. Newborn’s body is sterile in womb. When it passes through mother’s vagina, bacteria in vagina adopts new body. These bacteria gives newborn sense and direction for breastfeeding. This is the reason why majority C-section delivered infants do not have immediate sense to suck mother’s nipple. Their essential friends from vagina are missing! We are protected from bad bacteria because good friends are present. As soon as we live in stress (lack of nutrition or mental stress), good friends start dying. Once they die, our body is exposed to all so called bad bacteria (actually they are not bad. They are doing their job to clean the dead bacteria and body cells).

If I start writing all good things bacteria do for us, this note will become book 🙂.

Amazing ecology host we are. We are caretakers of all tillion+ bacteria friends. In return, they provide us healthy life.

What changes in life style are needed?

1) Take healthy food so that you always remain healthy and provide enough food to bacteria friends. Fresh Air, fresh water and organic food – must strive for it.
2) Routine should be regular so that body is never under stress and so bacteria friends are never under stress.
3) Do not take mental stress at work, at home, in family relations.
4) Do not be so ambitious that you take a toll of body.
5) If you follow point 1-4, you will never need antibiotics. Avoid them
6) Stop usage of cleaning agents at home and gradually adopt natural cleaning agents like

Take care.

Side note: Antibiotics are like Tsunami of chemicals. Total destruction by highest level of cellular depression. They cannot differentiate good vs bad bacteria. They purge all. Once they purge all, body is again sterile. You never know, what all new bacteria will come back. So better to remain healthy and avoid them.


Research


We Are Our Bacteria

We may think of ourselves as just human, but we’re really a mass of microorganisms housed in a human shell. Every person alive is host to about 100 trillion bacterial cells. They outnumber human cells 10 to one and account for 99.9 percent of the unique genes in the body.

Our collection of microbiota, known as the microbiome, is the human equivalent of an environmental ecosystem. Although the bacteria together weigh a mere three pounds, their composition determines much about how the body functions and, alas, sometimes malfunctions.

Like ecosystems the world over, the human microbiome is losing its diversity, to the potential detriment of the health of those it inhabits.

Dr. Martin J. Blaser, a specialist in infectious diseases at the New York University School of Medicine and the director of the Human Microbiome Program, has studied the role of bacteria in disease for more than three decades. His research extends well beyond infectious diseases to  autoimmune conditions and other ailments that have been increasing sharply worldwide.

In his new book, “Missing Microbes,” Dr. Blaser links the declining variety within the microbiome to our increased susceptibility to serious, often chronic conditions,  from allergies and celiac disease to Type 1 diabetes and obesity. He and others primarily blame antibiotics for the connection.

The damaging effect of antibiotics on microbial diversity starts early, Dr. Blaser said. The average American child is given nearly three courses of antibiotics in the first two years of life, and eight more  during the next eight years. Even a short course of antibiotics like the widely prescribed  Z-pack (azithromycin, taken for five days), can result in long-term shifts in the body’s microbial environment.

But antibiotics are not the only way the balance within us can be disrupted. Cesarean deliveries, which  have soared  in recent decades, encourage the growth of microbes from the mother’s skin, instead of from the birth canal, in the baby’s gut, Dr. Blaser said in an interview.

This change in microbiota can reshape an infant’s metabolism and immune system. A recent review of 15 studies involving 163,796 births found that, compared with  babies delivered vaginally, those born by cesarean section were 26 percent more likely to be overweight and 22 percent more likely to be obese as adults.

The placenta has a microbiome of its own, researchers have discovered, which may also contribute to the infant’s gut health and help mitigate the microbial losses caused by cesarean sections.

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