Bacteria

Bacteria

Oldest Stomach Bacteria, India Origin and Outbound Aryan Migration

1
untitled
I wrote this note couple of years back:
“The Persians admits that their forefathers were from Bharat bhumi.Egyptians concurs. Greeks (the Pelasgians), The Latians, The Scandinavians, The Druids, The Phoenicians, and The Aztec of South America – they all feel the same.

But some Indians still feel the opposite. They think, their forefathers are from some distant land.Linguistics and anthropology are enough to debunk this theory but I am surprised how cherished but erroneous assumptions in linguistics and anthropology were accepted without question.

Aryan Invasion? No way.
Migration – yes, of two kinds.
1) Inbound migration of culturally challenged tribes to culturally super rich land and civilization.
2) Outbound migration of sages, merchants and kings to realize Vasudhaive Kutumbakam.”

Here is the biological evidence supporting outbound migration of humans from Indian subcontinent.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
This is not a picture of a galaxy, but of your stomach. What you see is Helicobacter pylori or H. pylori, a bacterium found in our stomach. This particular bacterium is found in the stomach of half of the world’s population and is more than 100,000 years old.
A recent study, which looked at the gastrointestinal tract of a 5300 yr old iceman has revealed some interesting information about this person. This iceman lived in the Italian Alps and was probably a European farmer. When he was between 40 and 50 years old, he was murdered by someone using an arrow. He is called an iceman because his body was preserved  by freeze drying in a glacier.
Analysis of the bacterium revealed that he did not have the strain that most modern Europeans have. His strain was from India, especially North India. This strain was also the co-ancestor of the current European strain.  What this tells us is that the India strain was present in Europe during the copper age; there was a movement of people into Europe  during that period.  This strain, which was found in the iceman’s body is also different from the strain that modern Indians have. This tells us that that people went from India to Europe, stayed there and were genetically isolated from the Indian population. This isolated group became ancestral to the European strain. [1]
H. pylori in humans was nearly omnipresent until recently. Now with Antibiotics, these form of Prana (प्राण) has surrendered. 58,000 years is the longest possible relation with human stomach.
 
Most microbes’ origin would be traced to tropic of cancer line as this is the Muladhar chakra (मूलाधार चक्र) for mother Earth. Sometimes they find African origin, sometimes Asian and sometimes Mayan origin for XYZ gene or ABC microbe ;).
 
Check link[2] to know why H. Pylori is disappearing and what havoc its absence will cause/is causing.
—————
References
———————

[1 ]Helicobacter pylori and Out of India Theory

[2] Disappearing Microbiota: Helicobacter pylori Protection against Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

f1-large

Relative incidences of gastric H. pylori colonization, NCGC, and EAC during the 20th century in the United States and other now-developed countries. After a relatively short latency, the incidence of NCGC began to decrease in parallel with the declining incidence of H. pylori. However, the increase in EAC did not begin until many decades after both H. pylori and noncardia gastric cancer had begun to decrease.
Relative incidences of gastric H. pylori colonization, NCGC, and EAC during the 20th century in the United States and other now-developed countries. After a relatively short latency, the incidence of NCGC began to decrease in parallel with the declining incidence of H. pylori. However, the increase in EAC did not begin until many decades after both H. pylori and noncardia gastric cancer had begun to decrease.

Once rare, esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is the most rapidly increasing malignancy in many developed countries, such as the United States, United Kingdom, Australia, and Norway, and now is surpassing esophageal squamous cell carcinomas in certain populations (1, 2). EAC has very specific clinical and epidemiologic characteristics: It involves the distal but not proximal esophagus, preferentially affects males and people of higher socioeconomic status, and unlike esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, is not related to drinking alcohol or smoking (3). The rapid increase in EAC is not an artifact of surveillance or classification (4); it is real and frightening. A smaller increase in adenocarcinomas involving the gastric cardia is probably related to the increase in EAC (5); however, this relationship is unclear because the origin of cardia tumors, which frequently are advanced when diagnosed, could be esophageal or gastric.

In recent years, it has become clear that EAC is a consequence of long-term gastroesophageal reflux disease, an inflammatory condition of the distal esophagus (6), often through progression to Barrett’s esophagus, a metaplastic malady that may become dysplastic (7, 8). The three progressive and related conditions—gastroesophageal reflux disease, Barrett’s esophagus, and EAC—have been increasing over the past several decades in developed countries; their substantial increase is a late 20th century phenomenon; and they were essentially unknown before 1900 (9).

Read more : http://cancerpreventionresearch.aacrjournals.org/content/1/5/308

 

Bacteria: Our friends

0

untitled

Bacteria our friends, really?

Bacteria are our friends. Viruses are our messengers.
When we kill both the friends and their messengers, we are doomed.
It is high time we look at science of health with new fresh holistic perspective.

We may think of ourselves as just human, but we’re really a mass of microorganisms housed in a human shell. Every person alive is host to about 100 trillion bacterial cells. They outnumber human cells 10 to one and account for 99.9 percent of the unique genes in the body.
Our collection of microbiota, known as the microbiome, is the human equivalent of an environmental ecosystem. Although the bacteria together weigh a mere three pounds, their composition determines much about how the body functions and, alas, sometimes malfunctions.
In short, what we are boast as body, is nothing but gift of our friends i.e.Bacteria. What we call ‘I’ is nothing but summation of Ego of all bacterial communities we host. Our habits, our responses are governed by them. As per one research, our cravings for specific food taste is also governed by these tiny little friends living in our body. Newborn’s body is sterile in womb. When it passes through mother’s vagina, bacteria in vagina adopts new body. These bacteria gives newborn sense and direction for breastfeeding. This is the reason why majority C-section delivered infants do not have immediate sense to suck mother’s nipple. Their essential friends from vagina are missing! We are protected from bad bacteria because good friends are present. As soon as we live in stress (lack of nutrition or mental stress), good friends start dying. Once they die, our body is exposed to all so called bad bacteria (actually they are not bad. They are doing their job to clean the dead bacteria and body cells).

If I start writing all good things bacteria do for us, this note will become book 🙂.

Amazing ecology host we are. We are caretakers of all tillion+ bacteria friends. In return, they provide us healthy life.

What changes in life style are needed?

1) Take healthy food so that you always remain healthy and provide enough food to bacteria friends. Fresh Air, fresh water and organic food – must strive for it.
2) Routine should be regular so that body is never under stress and so bacteria friends are never under stress.
3) Do not take mental stress at work, at home, in family relations.
4) Do not be so ambitious that you take a toll of body.
5) If you follow point 1-4, you will never need antibiotics. Avoid them
6) Stop usage of cleaning agents at home and gradually adopt natural cleaning agents like

Take care.

Side note: Antibiotics are like Tsunami of chemicals. Total destruction by highest level of cellular depression. They cannot differentiate good vs bad bacteria. They purge all. Once they purge all, body is again sterile. You never know, what all new bacteria will come back. So better to remain healthy and avoid them.


Research


We Are Our Bacteria

We may think of ourselves as just human, but we’re really a mass of microorganisms housed in a human shell. Every person alive is host to about 100 trillion bacterial cells. They outnumber human cells 10 to one and account for 99.9 percent of the unique genes in the body.

Our collection of microbiota, known as the microbiome, is the human equivalent of an environmental ecosystem. Although the bacteria together weigh a mere three pounds, their composition determines much about how the body functions and, alas, sometimes malfunctions.

Like ecosystems the world over, the human microbiome is losing its diversity, to the potential detriment of the health of those it inhabits.

Dr. Martin J. Blaser, a specialist in infectious diseases at the New York University School of Medicine and the director of the Human Microbiome Program, has studied the role of bacteria in disease for more than three decades. His research extends well beyond infectious diseases to  autoimmune conditions and other ailments that have been increasing sharply worldwide.

In his new book, “Missing Microbes,” Dr. Blaser links the declining variety within the microbiome to our increased susceptibility to serious, often chronic conditions,  from allergies and celiac disease to Type 1 diabetes and obesity. He and others primarily blame antibiotics for the connection.

The damaging effect of antibiotics on microbial diversity starts early, Dr. Blaser said. The average American child is given nearly three courses of antibiotics in the first two years of life, and eight more  during the next eight years. Even a short course of antibiotics like the widely prescribed  Z-pack (azithromycin, taken for five days), can result in long-term shifts in the body’s microbial environment.

But antibiotics are not the only way the balance within us can be disrupted. Cesarean deliveries, which  have soared  in recent decades, encourage the growth of microbes from the mother’s skin, instead of from the birth canal, in the baby’s gut, Dr. Blaser said in an interview.

This change in microbiota can reshape an infant’s metabolism and immune system. A recent review of 15 studies involving 163,796 births found that, compared with  babies delivered vaginally, those born by cesarean section were 26 percent more likely to be overweight and 22 percent more likely to be obese as adults.

The placenta has a microbiome of its own, researchers have discovered, which may also contribute to the infant’s gut health and help mitigate the microbial losses caused by cesarean sections.

Read more:

Popular Posts

My Favorites

Akhada : Culture of Bala and Shakti

You must read this and take oath to revive tradition of बल & शक्ति. शक्ति पर्व is a favorable time to act. जय माँ! A...

CT Scan damages DNA