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Medical science can try N-efforts but they cannot create formula that can compete with mother’s milk.

Mothers’ milk guides the development of neonates’ gut microbiota, nourishing a very specific bacterial population that protects the child. Now a team of researchers has identified the compound in the milk that supplies this nourishment, and has shown that it can be obtained from cow’s milk, which could result in using cow’s milk as a prebiotic for infants.

If you are lactating mother, do not compromise.(Y). Do your best so that your child gets invaluable boons.

On the same note, without torturing Gau mata, receive her prasad for daily प्राणपूर्ति.

जीवनके श्री गणेश (GUT Mircrobial protection) माताही (Breastfeeding) करती है|


Research


MOTHERS’ MILK AND THE INFANT GUT MICROBIOTA: AN ANCIENT SYMBIOSIS

https://www.asm.org/index.php/journal-press-releases/94134-mothers-milk-and-the-infant-gut-microbiota-an-ancient-symbiosis

Nursing infants’ gastrointestinal tracts are enriched with specific protective microbes. Mother’s milk, itself, guides the development of neonates’ gut microbiota, nourishing a very specific bacterial population that, in turn, provides nourishment and protects the child. Now a team from the University of California, Davis, has identified the compound in the milk that supplies this nourishment, and has shown that it can be obtained from cow’s milk. This work could result in using cow’s milk to provide that compound as a prebiotic for infants. The research is published ahead of print on April 15th in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.
In earlier research, these investigators, led by David A. Mills, PhD, had shown that glycoproteins from milk, which contain both protein, and molecules containing multiple sugars, called oligosaccharides, were the source of that nourishment. They also had found that the infant-associated subspecies of the bacterium, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis), produced an enzyme that could cleave the oligosaccharides from the milk glycoproteins, and they had identified that enzyme.
For the current study, Mills, who is Professor and Shields Endowed Chair in Dairy Food Science, and his collaborators posited that these oligosaccharides were the food source for B. infantis. They then showed that the enzyme could break down glycoproteins not only from mother’s milk, but from cow’s milk, releasing the oligosaccharides.
“The released oligosaccharides turned out to be an incredible substrate for B. infantis’ growth,” said Mills. At the same time, Mills et al. showed that the oligosaccharides did not nourish adult-associated bifidobacteria.
All that suggests that getting the bioactive oligosaccharides into infant formula could improve it, said Mills. But his emphasis is on the science, he said. “The amazing thing to me is how selective these released oligosaccharides are as a substrate for growth.”
Mills noted that B. infantis has many genes involved in breaking down glycoproteins in mother’s milk in order to release the oligosaccharides. Mother’s milk coevolved over millions of years with mammals, and with their beneficial gut microbiota that it helped to thrive. “It is the only food that co-evolved with humans to make us healthy,” said Mills.

Oligosaccharides released from milk glycoproteins are selective growth substrates for infant-associated bifidobacteria

http://aem.asm.org/content/early/2016/03/28/AEM.00547-16.abstract

Milk, in addition to nourishing the neonate, provides a range of complex glycans whose construction ensures a specific enrichment of key members of the gut microbiota in the nursing infant, a consortium known as the milk-oriented microbiome. Milk glycoproteins are thought to function similarly, as specific growth substrates for bifidobacteria common to the breast fed infant gut. Recently, a cell wall-associated endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (EndoBI-1) found in various infant-borne bifidobacteria was shown to remove a range of intact N-linked glycans. We hypothesized that these released oligosaccharide structures can serve as a sole source for the selective growth of bifidobacteria. Here, EndoBI-1 was used to release these N-glycans from concentrated bovine colostrum at the pilot scale. EndoBI-1-released N-glycans supported the rapid growth of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis, a species that grows well on human milk oligosaccharides, but did not support growth of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, a species which does not. Conversely Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697 did not grow on the deglycosylated milk protein fraction clearly demonstrating that the glycan portion of milk glycoproteins provides the key substrate for growth. Mass spectrometry-based profiling revealed that B.longum subsp. infantis consumed 73% of neutral and 92% of sialylated N-glycans, while B. animalis subsp. lactis only degraded 11% of neutral and virtually no (<1%) sialylated N-glycans. These results provide mechanistic support that N-linked glycoproteins from milk serve as selective substrates for the enrichment of infant-borne bifidobacteria capable of carrying out the initial deglycosylation. Moreover, released N-glycans are better growth substrates than the intact milk glycoproteins suggesting that EndoBI-1 cleavage is a key initial step in consumption of glycoproteins. Finally, the variety of N-glycans released from bovine milk glycoproteins suggests they may serve as novel prebiotic substrates with selective properties similar to those of human milk oligosaccharides.

 

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